Rocky weighs in on Torture | Buzz Blog
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Rocky weighs in on Torture

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President Obama’s ruling out prosecution of CIA agents who participated in torture—and waffling about whether anyone will be prosecuted for alleged torture during the War on Terror—has former Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson riled.

An appeal sent today from Anderson’s High Road for Human Rights organization

asks for signatures on a letter to be sent to Washington D.C. demanding a commission to probe the extent of torture and hold participants to account.

“Since the Nuremberg trials, the U.S. and the international community have rejected the ‘I-was-just-following-orders’ defense to torture, killing, and other outrages against human beings. Certainly, we must also reject the ‘A-lawyer-said-it-would-be-all right defense,” Anderson writes.

In the appeal, Anderson argues that anti-torture treaties that the United States has signed, including the Geneva Conventions, require the prosecution of government torturers. He also notes that U.S. servicemen were prosecuted for waterboarding during the Vietnam War. The High Road appeal can be read here.