Review: Dead Prez at Urban Lounge | Buzz Blog
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Review: Dead Prez at Urban Lounge

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It's been 10 years since Dead Prez entered the hip-hop scene with a forceful message of political and cultural revolution.--- But we're still in the same wars, our poverty level has not improved, racism in law enforcement hasn't shown any recordable progress, and, well, all the shit that pissed Dead Prez off a decade ago was still pissin' 'em off last night at Urban Lounge.

The duo of Stic Man and M1 opened the "KRCL Presents" show a little ironically, rapping "Turn off the radio," telling fans their message is "so real the radio will never play it, but that's cool, the enemy supposed to hate it, freedom ain't gon' come 'till we regulate 'em." And they're probably right, if by "real" you mean openly socialist, fervently revolutionary, in-your-face "f--- the police" kinda real. Their enemy? The whole system, especially the po-lice. "When you bring' the real you don't get rotation unless you take over the station."

Dead Prez is probably the most confrontational of the big-names still active in political hip-hop and many of their songs would shock even people who think of themselves as liberal. But more than just shocking, Dead Prez puts some literate lyrics to their beats so, agree with them or not, one can appreciate the poetry in their delivery.

Rapping "That's War," "Hell Yeah," "Runaway Slave, the vegan-advocating "Be Healthy," their biggest hit "Hip-Hop," and telling the crowd, "It's cool to criticize the government," Dead Prez can bring out their kindred spirits to a show and keep them energized. If the the huddled masses in America's streets really do topple this shit like it's Cairo, you can bet Dead Prez either helped inspire the movement--or at very least, foretold it's coming.

If you want to see the future, or if you're it's news to you that Americans are openly advocating for overthrow of the American regime, check out Dead Prez and get educated.

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