Robert Paisola mixes it up with Occupy Las Vegas | Buzz Blog
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Robert Paisola mixes it up with Occupy Las Vegas

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The last I heard of former City Weekly cover subject Robert Paisola, he was moving to Las Vegas. Now it seems folks in Las Vegas are getting a taste of the Paisola treatment and, like some in Utah, regretting their association with him.---

According to a series of November 2011 postings on the Occupy Las Vegas [OLV] Website, which you can see here, Paisola volunteered as a photographer for the group and was duly appointed as one of seven official still photographers for OLV.

Problems arose when Paisola pointed his camera at people in a no-photograph zone. "This is now an issue and we must resolve it so that our members do not feel intimidated by the camera," wrote one disturbed OLV supporter. "A lot of folks would lose their jobs if they were to be publicly associated with the movement yet show up and support us anyway." 

That, however, did not dissuade Paisola, wrote OLV site user "Breadman," from filming people whom he was told could not be filmed. "Breadman" instructed Paisola several times not "to pan his camera into the no-camera zone. [...] I made it clear the third time he did it and he refused to pan away and kept it pointed at the no-camera zone for a solid minute even when people had to physically cover his lens."

The situation worsened when, according to posters, Paisola stamped the pics as the property of both Paisola's Western Capital Multimedia and NBC-Universal and posted them on his Website. Just what NBC-Universal has to do with all this isn't clear. Paisola has a long history of claiming associations with high-profile media names, be they individuals or corporations. Most notable was CNN, which resulted, according to news reports, in a lawsuit by the news giant to stop him claiming he was CNN-credentialed.I wrote a cover story about Paisola's disturbing world in 2007 titled Conman.com, which you can read here.