Inmates Leave "The Hole" | Buzz Blog
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Inmates Leave "The Hole"

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Good news from “the hole,” according to a letter City Weekly received this week. Two of the inmates featured in a recent cover story about solitary confinement were moved to less-draconian locations in the maximum-security wing of Utah State Prison.---

Ryan Allison was one of four inmates with mental-health issues held in solitary confinement in Uinta 1, a 96-cell, eight-section part of the prison that City Weekly highlighted in the cover story "Lost in the Hole."

Allison wrote that, since the story, “changes are already under way.” The prison has moved Jeremy Haas out of Uinta 1 to Uinta 4, “a regular-max building,” Allison writes. Allison himself was moved from section 4 of Uinta 1, known as the “low side,” to section 8, aka the “high side.”

“I now have more privileges and freedoms,” he writes. In addition, he notes, the Disability Law Center has opened up an investigation on his behalf.

He expressed gratitude that people such as Debbie Stone, another inmate’s mother and a tireless advocate for the prisoners, continue to express concern for their well-being. “It is nice to know that there are people in the community that are trying to help us even though we were a problem/disruption when we were out in the community.”

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