Alty News: Microsoft's Offshore Billions and the New Struggle in Missouri | Buzz Blog

Alty News: Microsoft's Offshore Billions and the New Struggle in Missouri

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Microsoft has admitted to keeping $92 billion offshore to avoid paying taxes in the United States.—

Top of Alty Utah

“Microsoft Admits Keeping $92 Billion Offshore to Avoid Paying $29 Billion in U.S. Taxes.”—International Business Times

A journalist was singed by a flashbang grenade raising questions about the police's use of “less lethal” force in Ferguson.—ProPublica

Activists in Missouri say the next showdown will be ousting a longtime prosecutor who has a deep bias in favor of the police.—Slate

Treating Ebola victims as disease-carriers instead of human beings can be a disastrous public-health strategy.—The Atlantic

Top of Alty Utah

Salt Lake City will soon halt sales of the discounted “Hive Pass” transit fare program and assess whether or not to continue it in the future or ditch it altogether.—Salt Lake City Weekly

According to a recent poll Utahns support the state's contested same-sex marriage ban but expect to lose the court battle to uphold it.—Utah Political Capitol

Former lawmaker Jackie Biskupski may be gearing up to run for mayor of Salt Lake City in 2015.—Utah Policy

A man explains what happens when a fundraiser for John Swallow allegedly had him restrained and beaten for reaching out to the FBI about the fundraiser's business.—Salt Lake City Weekly

Rantosphere

John English at the Utah Politico Hub argues it's time to demilitarize the police force.

“The military protects against enemies, like terrorists. But since you are as likely to be killed by your furniture as a terrorist, perhaps we don’t need all those sleepy suburban police department to be stocked with MRAPs and surveillance drones. Why do towns as small as Redwood City, CA, need a SWAT vehicle? Answer: They don’t. Emphasis on the word 'need.'”—Utah Politico Hub

The Long View

Michelle Lyons worked as a reporter and for the Texas Corrections system and during her time witnessed 278 executions, a job that took a heavy toll on her.

“She was flooded with memories from her time inside the Death House: of the conversations she had shared with particular inmates in the hours before they were strapped to the gurney; of the mothers, dressed in their Sunday best, who had turned out to attend their sons’ executions; of the victims’ families, their faces hardened with grief; of the sudden stillness that came over the prisoners soon after the lethal drugs entered their bloodstreams. She could still see some of these men—their chests expanding, their chins stiffening as they took their last breaths.”—Texas Monthly

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