Movie Reviews: War Dogs, Ben-Hur, Kubo and the Two Strings, Hell or High Water | Buzz Blog
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Movie Reviews: War Dogs, Ben-Hur, Kubo and the Two Strings, Hell or High Water

Lo and Behold, Don't Think Twice

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Summer winds down with the arrival of a Biblical epic, a new Werner Herzog documentary and one of the best films of the year, animated or otherwise.

War Dogs (pictured) showcases another terrific performance by Jonah Hill, but can't find the right tone in its real-life tale of sociopathic capitalism. Werner Herzog's Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World  hits more than it misses in its episodic study of life in the Internet age. Writer/director Mike Birbiglia effectively uses the milieu of improv comedy as a metaphor for adults at personal crossroads in Don't Think Twice.

Eric D. Snider finds the new Ben-Hur a pointless, plodding remake that never offers a reason for its own existence.

Andrew Wright observes that great central performances and pungent dialogue help Hell or High Water transcend its familiar Western premise.

In this week's feature review, Kubo and the Two Strings uses stop-motion animation to deliver a stunning celebration of the connecting power of stories and mythology.