Movie Reviews: Coco, Last Flag Flying, The Man Who Invented Christmas | Buzz Blog
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Movie Reviews: Coco, Last Flag Flying, The Man Who Invented Christmas

Three Billboards, Novitiate

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The busy Thanksgiving holiday weekend brings the latest from Pixar, a tale of Charles Dickens and more.

Disney/Pixar's Coco (pictured) creates a fascinating new world with an emotional hook that might be tied to its cultural specificity. Novitiate (opening Friday at Broadway Centre Cinemas) sensitively explores the emotional upheaval at a convent after the Vatican II reforms.

MaryAnn Johanson praises a trio of great performance in Richard Linklater's road-trip drama Last Flag Flying.

The story of Charles Dickens' creation of A Christmas Carol becomes the affable gentle holiday biopic The Man Who Invented Christmas.

Also opening this week, but not screened for press: Denzel Washington plays an idealistic defense attorney facing one of his toughest cases in Roman J. Israel, Esq.

In this week's feature review, righteous anger gets a caustically funny critique in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.