Citizen Revolt: Feb. 20 | Citizen Revolt | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly
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News » Citizen Revolt

Citizen Revolt: Feb. 20

Attend a panel hosted by U.S. Rep. Ben McAdams on the cost of prescription drugs. It's time yet again to share your thoughts on congestion in our canyons. Plus, hear about the history behind the Census.

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LOWER DRUG COSTS PANEL
Things are so bad, the government here is sending workers to Mexico to buy prescription drugs. States from Colorado to Massachusetts are trying to find ways to make these meds more affordable. Now you have a chance to hear how Congress might be addressing this life-threatening problem. U.S. Rep. Ben McAdams is holding a Town Hall Forum: Lowering the Cost of Prescription Drugs, with a panel of experts. California is contracting with pharmaceutical companies to make drugs under a state label and other states are looking at importing from Canada. With the lobbying power of pharmaceutical companies, creative solutions and a clear legislative agenda are imperative. Millcreek Community Center, 2266 E. Evergreen Ave., Thursday, Feb. 20, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/31PZ2fo

COMMENT ON CANYON CONGESTION
If you've ever been caught in an endless traffic jam headed up one of the Cottonwood canyons, you've probably thought of countless scenarios to ease the pain. Now's the time to study up and comment on what you think should be done. The Central Wasatch Commission "Mountain Transportation System Plan" attempts to "arrive at a proposed comprehensive year-round transportation system that includes the Salt Lake Valley, Big and Little Cottonwood canyons, Parleys Canyon and connections to the Wasatch Back." Read the Save Our Canyons "Idealized Transportation Concept": bit.ly/2tXqAmz and then comment here: bit.ly/2UQ5mln by Sunday, March 1.

THE CENSUS AND RACE
In 1790 when the first Census took place, there were three racial categories: free white male/free white female, slave, or other free person. "The census was used to count African Americans as three-fifths a person, send Japanese Americans to internment camps during World War II and identify Arab-American communities after 9/11," the event website for Race and the U.S. Census: 1790 through 2020 says. This year, as we begin the decennial count, the mere talk of a citizenship question has sparked understandable fear in minority and immigrant communities and threatens an undercount particularly of the Latinx community. Hinckley Institute of Politics, 260 S. Campus Drive, Wednesday, Feb. 26, noon-1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2UWXdvs