Citizen Revolt: Week of November 25 | Citizen Revolt | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly
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News » Citizen Revolt

Citizen Revolt: Week of November 25

What Do You Think?, Vaccine Politics, Need a Home?, Meals for the Homeless

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What Do You Think?
Remember 2016? Remember how the polls kept telling us that Hillary Clinton was cruising toward a win? Well, that didn't happen. Enter the era of distrust in everything electoral, and of course, enter the era of Trumpism. Maybe you think that what Utahns want makes a difference nationally? Think again. U.S. presidential elections are decided by only a few key "battleground" states, and no one really thinks Utah makes a difference. At Strength in Numbers: How Polls Work and Why We Need Them, you'll hear about why polls still matter—especially those that measure local issues. "G. Elliott Morris is a data-driven journalist and author who writes about American politics, public opinion polling, demographics and elections. Morris will discuss how polls work, why they are important, and the magic and science behind forecasting elections," organizers say. Hinckley Institute of Politics, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, Gardner Commons: Room 2018, Thursday, Dec. 2, noon, free. https://bit.ly/3qKjYCO

Vaccine Politics
If you're wondering why the anti-vaxxers have such pull, take a look at history. While QAnon may be a relatively new phenomenon, vaccine hesitancy is not. "A Dialogue on the History of Vaccine Politics and Policywill put the current moment of vaccine hesitancy around COVID-19 in dialogue with what we know more broadly about vaccine hesitancy in the U.S. and around the world," organizers say. You'll find out: 1. Why are people sometimes hesitant to get vaccinated? 2. How unique is COVID-19 where vaccine hesitancy is concerned? 3. What can or should be done to try to alleviate public hesitancy around vaccination? There may be something you can do to change the narrative. There are economic implications that could persuade. Hinckley Institute of Politics, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, Gardner Commons: Room 2018, Wednesday, Dec. 1, noon., free. https://bit.ly/3qNfRpx

Need a Home?
The Utah Foundation just came out with a study on affordable housing—something that isn't a thing in Utah. They call attention to the "Missing Middle" because multi-unit housing, walkability and income diversity are lacking. At Solving for Housing in the Economic Inclusion Equation, you'll "learn from Utah and Idaho's leading experts on affordable housing while examining the impact housing has on the most vulnerable populations in our communities." Both Utah and Idaho housing markets are described as "hot" and "unhealthy," so much so that residents can't buy in their home states. Find out how to address this severely imbalanced problem with panelists from Zions Bank, NeighborWorks and the Utah Department of Indian Affairs. Virtual, Tuesday, Nov. 30, noon, free. https://bit.ly/3cfJ1VY

Meals for the Homeless
It's almost Thanksgiving, and volunteers (age 16 and over) can help to Make & Serve Meals at the VOA Youth Homeless Resource Center. Wear closed-toe shoes, a mask and comfortable clothing. Food is purchased by Love Lake City, so all they need is you. VOA Homeless Youth Resource Center, 888 S. 400 West, Thursday, Nov. 25, 5 p.m. Free/register at https://bit.ly/30rgha9