Good Riddance to Valley Mental Health | Letters | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly
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News » Letters

Good Riddance to Valley Mental Health

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2 comments
I would like to thank Salt Lake County for not renewing Valley Mental Health’s contract [“Valley Mental Health Again Facing Layoffs?” March 24, CityWeekly.net].

I left Valley Mental Health when my doctor decided not to work for Valley Mental Health anymore. I am a person with a severe traumatic brain injury. My hobbies are very therapeutic for me, helping me to think out my problems. My hobbies have helped so I do not need to take as much medication.

The administration cut the Pathways program, run by therapists, that helped stabilize severely mentally ill clients. I never had a need for Pathways, but if someone took my hobbies away from me, I would have a need for more medication—it’s also possible I would need to be hospitalized at taxpayers’ expense.

All the administration of Valley Mental Health cares about is excessive salaries, not the treatment of the mentally ill. At a time the health-care costs are out of control, Valley Mental Health would rather medicate and hospitalize the severely mentally ill, at taxpayers’ expense.

Tammi Diaz
South Salt Lake City