Lake Effect: A Darker Shade of Pink | News | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly
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News

Lake Effect: A Darker Shade of Pink

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When Utah’s “right to work” law was enacted in those black-and-white, clean-cut 1950s, it was intended to bring about a glorious era of worker independence and an end to the Red Menace.

Well, the nefarious socialists still haven’t taken over America—hell, we can’t even get universal health care enacted—so obviously this ploy by our corporate overlords worked. Unfortunately, instead of a glorious era of worker independence, it’s created a world in which grumpy gnomes like Bob Murray can get rich on the backs of honest, hardworking coal miners with less thought for their safety and welfare than for corporate profits.

A new bumper sticker commemorates the “success” of union busting in Coal Country. If wages don’t remain permanently depressed, perhaps we’ll even be able to afford one.
{::NOAD::}