Our Community part 2 | Cover Story | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly
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News » Cover Story

Our Community part 2

Local stories of adaptability and compassion to lift your cooped-up spirits.

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DEREK CARLISLE
  • Derek Carlisle

Since early March, we've watched the coronavirus (COVID-19) spread uncontrollably around the earth while the U.S. became its new global epicenter. We've seen our friends' businesses close for an undetermined amount of time, and we witnessed government "leaders" at every level trip up in their handling of the crisis, from organization to communication (nothing new for most of them). Like you, we can't wait to put all this COVID-19 business behind us. Who doesn't need a hug!

Human health is our No. 1 priority. We obsess over the numbers, so thank you to those who follow the #staysafestayhome directive—it appears to be working everywhere except for the Darwin Award candidates in Utah County who can't seem to put their personal priorities above those of the full society. STFH! That said, separating human health from financial health in daily conversation is nearly impossible: No health, no finances.

As we talk about what this world will look like when the pandemic inevitably passes, we cannot forget the folks who were forced to sacrifice financially to preserve our physical health. That's why, in this issue and issues to follow, City Weekly will highlight members of the local business community who paid the freight for coronavirus spread. It's important to understand that the experiences of our neighbors are uniquely different when working from home is simply not an option. Please get to know the individuals on these pages, and as always. SUPPORT LOCAL!

—Pete Saltas



DEREK CARLISLE
  • Derek Carlisle

Lisa Forman
Owner
Legends Pub & Grill

What's been your biggest challenge?
Finances.

Will your business model change?
I haven't decided since so much is unknown. We will have better to-go options in place, for sure. We did have a good jump in that but drive-thru is definitely much busier, as I observe, with cost and simplicity. Still, it's mostly chains that have [drive-thrus].

What's your bestseller?
Pac12 Burger.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Seeing our staff and customers.

Are you offering any specials?
We are doing a 20% discount when ordering online for curbside pickup. We would like to let people know that third-party delivery companies charge the business 25-30%, so if you can order directly from your favorite place (if they offer curbside), it's a much better option in terms of helping that business (and safer right now)

How are you passing the time?
Reading and listening to positive books, watching comedy movies, baking and just really paying attention to all the amazing things that people and our country are doing and having profound gratitude for it all.

What are you working on now?
New menu options, our new rewards program, a new website and improving the stuff that we need to make our business better when we reopen

What's a takeaway from this?
Shit can get real ... real fast, and our government can and will shut you down!

Your parting shot?
Sincere gratitude for all the local support! It means so much to so many.

801.355.3598 | 677 S. 200 West, SLC
801.679.1749 | 10631 S. Holiday Park Drive, Sandy
WhyLegends.com



DEREK CARLISLE
  • Derek Carlisle

Joanna Rendi
Owner
Moochie's Meatballs & More

What's been your biggest challenge?
Inconsistent and incomplete information from government officials and having to shift operations on a daily—sometimes hourly—basis.

Will your business model change?
We plan to offer delivery as a normal part of business and focus on more prepackaged takeout options. We'll probably continue to meet with our managers via Zoom to have better communication.

What are your bestsellers?
Philly cheesesteaks and handmade meatballs.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Seeing people in the restaurant and going out with friends. People going back to work and not being on my favorite hiking trails!

Are you offering any specials?
We're offering two bottles of jalapeno sauce for $10 with any order. We are also offering free delivery in a limited area and a small delivery fee outside of that area.

How are you passing the time?
I am busier than ever, so filling time is never a problem.

What are you working on now?
Getting ready to move my office.

What's a takeaway from this?
This, too, shall pass.

Your parting shot?
I'm starting to wonder if the whole thing is a big psychological experiment to see how much the government can control our behavior. I know people are getting sick and dying, but we lose more people with the regular flu than this. We lose people by smoking, car accidents—you name it—none of those things seem to warrant this type of response. And yet the stock market continues to climb. Who is making money off this?

Four locations: SLC, South Salt Lake, Midvale and Lehi | moochiesmeatballs.com



CITYHOME COLLECTIVE
  • Cityhome Collective

Jean-Michel Arrigona
Owner
Natur

What's been your biggest challenge?
It's been challenging (and rewarding) trying to reinvent yourself to work with the way people are currently buying. Staying in touch with your customers.

Will your business model change?
I hope that the way we have chosen to respond to this event will have especially improved our online presence.

What are your bestsellers?
Our business is retail sales/art gallery. Framed specimens from the natural world are probably our bestsellers.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Seeing people back in the store, visiting with people, traveling! Eating out! Eating out. Did I mention eating out?

Anything you wish to share with the public?
We've all got to hang in there. It might seem difficult to imagine that this will be over someday, but it will be. Take care of yourselves, so you can help take care of others.

801.232.4311 | 94 W. 7720 South, Midvale
naturshowroom.com



MIKE RIEDEL
  • Mike Riedel

Mark Medure
Owner Founder
Level Crossing Brewing

What's been your biggest challenge?
Understanding the various local and state orders to make sure we remain compliant and act socially responsible has been confusing and stressful. We've received differing orders at various times from Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County and state officials. It's been challenging to know which order is in effect and which one supersedes the others. Our No. 1 priority is to keep our staff and customers safe and protected. Not having continuity within local and state government is frustrating.

Will your business model change?
In the short term, we will continue to take precautions with our seating and possibly relocate tables so customers can maintain social distancing within the taproom while enjoying themselves. We will also continue to provide sanitizing stations throughout the facility and train staff to remind customers of the availability. Long term, we will continue to provide a high level of customer service and produce award-winning beers and delicious pizzas!

What is your business makeup?
Being only open for one year, our 90-seat taproom represented the majority of our business.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
We look forward to having our customers back and showing them the appreciation and generosity they have given us during the shutdown. We have been emotionally moved by the overwhelming support the community has shown not just toward us, but for all food and beverage spots throughout the Salt Lake metro area.

Are you offering any specials?
We are currently open 7 days per week, 11 a.m.–8 p.m., for takeout beer and pizza, along with no-contact pizza delivery. To order online, you can go to https://www.toasttab.com/levelcrossingbrewing/v3

385. 270.5752 | 2496 S. West Temple, South Salt Lake | levelcrossingbrewing.com



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

Matt Jackson, D.C.
Doctor and owner
Elevation Chiropractic Center

What's been your biggest challenge?
New business for sure. No one is wanting to start a new chiropractic health journey right now. Everyone is locked down and limiting their expenses—which is totally understandable. Luckily, I have a great existing patient base that is still coming in for care. But new patients have completely stopped calling in. I'm trying to create promotions and specials for them to book appointments for down the road when they feel more comfortable and life has come back to normal.

Will your business model change?
I think this will be really good for my business. This caught us all by storm in pretty much every way, and people are going to come out of this more preventative in nature. They're going to want to have more savings and food storage, and they're going to want to make sure they're in better health! Most of the time, we wait for symptoms to show up, then we deal with them. But after this is over, we're going to understand the need to prevent what causes the symptoms and the bigger health issues—proactive instead of reactive, if you will.

What are your bestsellers?
My adjustments! Who doesn't want to feel better and move their body with more ease? I've worked very hard to refine my skills and connect with each person on my table to know how and where to adjust them. Everything here is tailored to them and their unique needs.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
I've been sitting on an idea for months but have been too chicken to roll it out. That fear has been fixed by this experience. I have identified 15-plus professions that, based on their job requirements, beat up bodies, creating a need for my services. I have care programs created to help them physically without breaking their bank. I will be hitting the pavement to meet with them in their offices and explain this professional care program. It's not a groundbreaking idea, but it's one that I've been too worried about the details to actually implement. No more of that!

Are you offering any specials?
I'm running an awesome special right now. It's a BOGO, buy one adjustment for you and one will be donated to a COVID-19 relief worker. If you know someone, you can give them the gift card. If you don't, I have a network ready to accept these contributions. They're $50 and can be purchased by calling or emailing the office. They can also be redeemed at a later date.

How are you passing the time?
Lots of games, mainly Disney Villainous, Ticket to Ride and Skyjo. Now that it's warming up, my wife and I like to take our dog, Baylor, for a walk after work through the neighborhood every night. And catching up on Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist.

What are you working on now?
I have lots of work stuff I'm doing. Finally, I have time to crank out content and plans for events, collabs I've been wanting to do. We have a patient appreciation event that got pushed back from May to November. I'm working with other businesses in the holistic health fields to create joint campaigns together. I'm a big believer in the idea of "a rising tide raises all ships."

What's a takeaway from this?
Gratitude for the little things. Never, ever, ever taking the minutiae of life for granted again. I think we can all agree on that one.

What day is it?
Good Friday. Despite how hard things are right now, I gain a lot of peace from what this day represents and means.

Your parting shot?
I think Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is a seriously underappreciated movie.

385.743.8833 | 515 E. 4500 South, Ste. G230, SLC | elevationcenterutah.com



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

Amy Wanderley-Britt
Owner
Pig & Jelly Jar/WB's Eatery

What's been your biggest challenge?
Managing the cash-flow strategy while making sure all our employees who want to work have the capability to do so has been challenging. Our team and community are most important to us always.

Will your business model change?
We were innovating within our company before COVID-19 to implement more online ordering platforms, e-commerce capabilities and food subscriptions. This crisis has propelled the ideas into action faster. We feel like the face of our business will forever change. However, these innovations we have implemented will remain in place to help us grow and rebuild.

What are your bestsellers?
Chicken & Waffles and our Ham Hash, for the win!

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Filling our restaurants back up with our favorite people.

Are you offering any specials?
Supporting locals is so important right now. Restaurants, grocery stores, pilates/yoga studios, clothing shops—everyone!

We are "paying it forward" by providing meals to frontline workers at drive-thru test sites on a weekly basis and allowing our community to donate on our website or through chownow so we can add drive-thru testing sites every week. Also, at 360 Degrees Restaurant group (parent company of Pig & A Jelly Jar and WB's Eatery), we believe in the power of positivity! Every to-go order will receive a sparkler and a positive note encouraging our guests to share their gratitude with the world and with us on social media at 9 p.m., every night.

How are you passing the time?
In all this madness, I guess, I, too, got what I asked for. I love spending time with my wife and our kids, two dogs and a cat. Also, been doing a lot of laundry—ha ha. We light up a sparkler every night at 9 p.m. to share our #gratitude with the world. Not a bad way to go to bed, is it?

What are you working on now?
Not a tan! But I'll have time for that soon, I believe.

What's a takeaway from this?
Appreciation and gratitude for what you have and never waste time not telling those you love how you feel. #gratitude #positivevibes #share

Your parting shot?
We are all in this together. Stay healthy, keep your head up and ask for help if you need it. Together, we will win!

Three Pig and a Jelly Jar locations in Salt Lake City, Holladay and Ogden
pigandajellyjar.com

WB's Eatery, The Monarch, 455 25th St., Ogden, 385.244.1471
wbseatery.com
Sparkler #gratitude on social media
pigandajellyjar | wbseatery



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

Brothers Nico & Christian Priskos
Managing partners
InterNet Properties

What's been your biggest challenge?
Showing buildings and space has, of course, become more difficult during this time. The utilization of technology has become extremely important as clients might not be not able or willing to go see commercial space. This technology has been around for some time and never really picked up steam in the commercial real estate market. However, we've had to adjust and use this technology more so by offering virtual building tours as needed with buyers and lessees.

Will your business model change?
In terms of long-term effects on our business, we don't think much will change. People will still need gathering places to eat, drink and enjoy each other's company. People will still need office space and industrial space for their businesses. It might take some time for the market to get back to where it was, but in the long run, we believe commercial real estate in Utah and in Salt Lake City will bounce back relatively quickly.

What are your bestsellers?
Commercial real estate!

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
We can't wait to get out and enjoy our tenants' establishments such as Whiskey Street, Alibi Bar and Place, Eva, Junior's, Quarters Arcade Bar and many others that have had to close their doors at this time.

Any information you wish to share with the public?
Downtown Salt Lake City will continue to be a vibrant, diverse and unique place when this all passes. As social distancing becomes a thing of the past, we will have first-class restaurants, bars, entertainment venues and much more back in full swing for everyone to enjoy again.

801.355.0600 | 51 E. 400 South, Ste. 210, SLC
iproperties.com



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

Ryan C
DJ/owner
Bangarang

What's been your biggest challenge?
Prioritizing the things I wanna get done in the next month.

Will your business model change?
I will take more chances ... do more gigs I normally wouldn't do.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Seeing happy people on the dance floor and, of course, DJing. But DJing from a more grateful standpoint. Making sure I put everything into my sets.

Is there anything you wish to share with the public?
I'm an amazing cook on the side.

How are you passing the time?
Lately, music production has been a huge focus of mine. So, I've spent a lot of time doing that.

What are you working on now?
New remixes and organizing my entire music library. It's been a task.

What's a takeaway from this?
Live now; nothing is promised.

What day is it?
Friday! (Had to look that up)

Your parting shot?
Please stay inside and wash your hands. I wanna do hood rat things with my friends.

djbangarang.com



DEREK CARLISLE
  • Derek Carlisle

Babs De Lay
Broker/owner
Urban Utah Homes & Estates

What's been your biggest challenge?
Making sure the lender, title company, buyer and seller and buyer's and seller's agents can all get to the closing of escrow without COVID-19 obstacles. Showing homes can be a challenge, as sellers at home (with or without kids) are sometimes hesitant to let people inside. We are still a state allowing real-estate agents to work, and I'm masked, gloved and sterilized at all times (as are my buyers).

Will your business model change?
No. However, I predict there will be a rush for some groups to sell because they are in financial trouble, and some investors might slow or stop purchases because they can't get rid of the seller's renters who are under Gov. Herbert's protection for now.

What types of clients do you have?
I have about one-third buyers, one-third sellers moving out of state or moving up/down, and one-third estate sales of the deceased.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Dinner with friends and clients.

Anything you wish to share with the public?
I'm as terrified as you are. I've lived and worked through three major recessions in my 36 years in the business, and this next one might be either the shortest or the biggest one yet.

801.595.8824 | 102 S. Rio Grande St, SLC urbanutah.com



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

Matthew Powers
Regional manager / GM/
Promotions director/marketing director
Sound Warehouse/US Electronics

What's been your biggest challenge?
Uncertainty.

Will your business model change?
We will have to see where we stand and then push "shop local/shop safe" by maintaining a clean environment in our stores and install shops.

What are your bestsellers?
New head units or replacement speakers.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Getting back to normality.

Are you offering any specials?
Our 41st anniversary sale.

How are you passing the time?
Binge-watching TV, calling loved ones and friends, going for walks, cleaning and organizing, and going for rides in the car.

What are you working on now?
Ads, budgets, inventory control and maintaining business.

What's a takeaway from this?
Be thankful for what you have going on; it may be taken away from you instantly.

What day is it?
Springtime in Utah (snow, sunshine, hot then cold).

Your parting shot?
Keep swimming, or you'll drown!

801.487.0741 | 2763 S. State, SLC
801.621.0086 | 28th & Wall, Ogden
801.226.6090 | 1680 N. State, Orem
soundwarehouse.com



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

Ross Metzger
Co-owner
Bewilder Brewing Co.

What's been your biggest challenge?
We had to shift our entire business model from a beer-over-the-bar tavern to more of a production brewery, since the only way we can sell beer at the moment is through growler fills. We are working on a packaging license and other means of physical packaging that will help make it easier for people to buy beer to go. We also had to change our food from 100 percent dine-in to 100 percent delivery and takeout.

Will your business model change?
It was part of our plan down the road to add both food takeout and delivery as well as increased packaging of beer. We've just needed to do it sooner rather than later.

What are your bestsellers?
Because we're so new, it's hard to say, but our Fresh Sesh IPA was selling well before things slowed down.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
We are excited for people to come back in and enjoy our space. We started to fill up the seats and get some traction with our dartboards and games. We were seeing some regulars. We opened Bewilder to be a place people could relax and have fun in a social environment with friends. We still want that.

Are you offering any specials?
We now have our online ordering system in place on our website to streamline food orders. We are still doing takeout and delivery, and you can still fill growlers (and now crowlers) to go.

How are you passing the time?
Work! We also own Salt City Brew Supply and people staying home have breathed new life into the hobby of homebrewing.So, if we are not at the brewery trying to pivot our business model, we are filling orders at the brew shop.

What are you working on now?
Besides the new packaging options, we are currently making some lagers for when the lockdown ends. These are beers we can age for a little bit without detriment to the product.

What's a takeaway from this?
Even for a brewery that just opened its doors, we have a lot of support from the other Utah breweries, and especially from our customers. They have been buying gift cards, ordering food, filling growlers and doing as much as they can to support us, which really makes us want to do the right thing by them and to do everything we can to stick around until this is over, and for years to come.

What day is it?
Another day to be thankful for something.

Your parting shot?
Remember all of your favorite small businesses out there and support them any way you can, even if you can't spend money in these trying times. Sign up for newsletters, like/share their social posts, ask them questions—anything to let them know they have not been forgotten.

385.528.3840 | 445 S. 400 West, SLC
bewilderbrewing.com



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

J.D. Lauritzen
Attorney
Christensen & Jensen

What's been your biggest challenge?
As an attorney, I am grateful to have the ability to continue working (albeit remotely from home) during the pandemic. My heart goes out to those who are not as fortunate. For me, the biggest obstacle has been maintaining a healthy balance between my work and personal life. I've tried to maintain my regular work schedule as much as possible. However, when things have felt overwhelming, I've tried to be mindful to take a break and do something to recenter myself.

Will your business model change?
I believe that when this is over, I will have a different appreciation of life and my profession. I will listen better to my body and mind. To that end, I intend to work more from home when I feel the need. I also believe that I will no longer take for granted many of the things in my work and personal life that I did before this happened. Most of all, I plan to find new ways to connect with clients and other attorneys to maintain better health and safety for us all.

What's your bestseller?
As an attorney, my bestselling item is my time. Although I have not lost the ability to give time to my clients' matters, I have lost the ability to interact with them in person. What was once a face-to-face meeting in my office is now a telephone call or a video conference. This time has taught me the importance of being able to adapt, that's for sure.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Being able to associate with my fellow colleagues. I miss having the ability to walk into a partner's office and pick their brain on an issue. I miss being able to interact with my other co-workers as well. I'm very much looking forward to the first time our entire office can get together and socialize.

Anything you wish to share with the public?
I want the public to know that the practice of law has been deemed "essential" during the pandemic, and, while the court system has slowed significantly, there is still help out there. This means that, if you or someone you know has a legal issue that needs to be addressed during this time, there are lawyers (like myself) who can help. You don't have to face your legal issues on your own.

How are you passing the time?
I've been listening to a lot of podcasts and audiobooks to pass my time. I've also made time each day to go outside and get some fresh air and sunshine, whether it be throwing a football around with my girlfriend or going on a long walk through the neighborhood. At night, I've been maxing out my Netflix membership (especially watching Tiger King).

What are you working on now?
I'm continuing to build my knowledge around cannabis and my cannabis law practice, hence the podcasts and audio books. I'm also cooking more at home and trying to better stay on top of things around the house. It's amazing what a clean house can do for your psyche.

What's a takeaway from this?
It's shown me what is truly important about life. To me, all of the material objects we obsess over and work to obtain are just that—objects. I hope that humanity remembers that fact when we emerge from this difficult time. What's most important is my fellow human and the way in which I treat him or her, not what's parked in my garage or hanging in my closet.

What day is it?
I think it's Friday, but I'd have to look at a calendar to tell you the date. The weeks keep flying by, but each day feels like a crawl.

Your parting shot?
To everyone, please stay safe and healthy. To those who I know and love, I can't wait to see you when this is over. Stay strong!

801-323-5000
257 E. 200 South, Ste. 1100, SLC
chrisjen.com



COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo

Johnny Dale
Owner
Johnny's On Second

What's been your biggestchallenge?
Dealing with so many unknown factors. There seems to be misinformation and conflicting information every day coming from our local, state and federal representatives. Navigating through what is rumor vs. what is really happening takes a lot of energy and time. Things like how long I need to stay closed, what kinds of relief packages are being offered, when will my employees get their unemployment checks, what will business be like when I can reopen and how can I come out of this not drowning in debt. It's been exhausting.

Will your business model change?
I have always been a frugal business owner; a trait learned through tough life lessons. As careful as I've been, however, this has been devastating to me financially and even more so for my employees. I'm not sure how this will change my business practice, but I would love to see more people learn to plan for unexpected and challenging times. I need to come up with new and innovative ways for my staff and patrons to be safe and yet still want to come have a good time at a local bar.

My answer is for the most part, no change. I've learned to grow within my own means and not incur debt that I cannot pay back. This ties into my previous answer in that I don't want to come out of this in debt. I might have more distrust for the government.

What's your bestseller?
Being known as the home of the $4 shot and a beer, it's hands down: "a $4 shot and a beer." I hope this never changes.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
Seeing the smiling faces of my patrons again; sharing stories of our lockdowns, providing a gathering place again where people can connect, laugh, dance, play pool and share a toast. I'm looking forward to my employees being back to work and knowing that they can pay their bills and provide for their families. Getting back to the business of business and knowing I can do all of this in a safe, clean environment.

Anything you wish to share with the public?
That Johnny's on Second has lots of elbow room. We understand that our world has changed, and we are actively thinking of ways to reinvent how we operate. We may not be able to have "happy hours," but we'll fight for something like that along with reinventing being social after we've all had to "social distance" ourselves. We'd like to celebrate St. Patrick's Day, Cinco de Mayo, birthdays, graduations, promotions—just being back to work. We'd like to celebrate our neighbors and families who've sacrificed and suffered.

How are you passing the time?
In all honesty, I still own a business that needs attention even though no revenue is coming in. I'm cleaning, repairing, organizing and planning as much as I can; it helps to stay focused. I spend a lot of time talking with other bar owners on how we can all come out of this and spent hours on the phone with the Utah Department of Workforce Services to help my employees get their checks. I'm figuring out bills and talking to neighbors, accountants and vendors. I've been working harder now than when my doors were open, and it's been stressful. So to counter that, I ride my bike, take the dogs for walks and work on the yard. And I've been playing lots of gin rummy with my girlfriend, who happens to be a psychiatric nurse and helps keep me sane!

What are you working on now?
Washing my hands, again. And making sure others are, as well.

What's a takeaway from this?
Try to be as prepared as possible for what life will eventually throw at you.

What day is it?
It's today. It's right now, it's all that I know I have.

Your parting shot?
I'm so grateful for my friends through this. Pete Saltas, you've been a great friend. Not a night goes by that I'm not connecting with someone, sharing stories of life. I know I'm not alone, and it makes me sad thinking about those out there who don't have that kind of support. I hope people can find a way to come back together and still feel safe.

801-746-3334
165 E. 200 South
johnnysonsecond.com



BILL PETERSON
  • Bill Peterson

Rob Eckman
Marketing manager
The King's English Bookshop

What's been your biggest challenge?
We had to quickly move to website order fulfillment on a much greater scale than ever before. We're working hard to fulfill customers orders quickly.

Will your business model change?
We don't want our business to change. We want to open our doors and see our customers again.

What's your bestseller?
It changes week to week, but it is always books.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
We cannot wait to begin events again, including book signings, storytimes (in the shop—we are already online daily with virtual storytime) and book clubs.

Anything you wish to share with the public?
We are so grateful for the amazing ways people are supporting us. It's comforting that people need books.

How are you passing the time?
Packing books into shipping envelopes. Then I wave through the bookshop window at passersby who are presumably on their way to Sugar House Park to get fresh air and exercise.

What are you working on now?
Finding more packing material.

Your parting shot?
Books are here to stay!

801.484.9100 | 1511 S.
1500 East | kingsenglish.com



DEREK CARLISLE
  • Derek Carlisle

Helen Wade
Owner
The Stockist

What's been your biggest challenge?
Oh, man, re-creating my entire business overnight has been the hardest. Overnight, we shut down and had to still create a steady stream of revenue—and all with a one-women crew.

Will your business model change?
I would love to go back to how we once were, but this has taught me a lot of new ways to do business. I will utilize social media more to interact and engage with my clients and brands. Definitely shift a little more focus to online.

What's your bestseller?
Thats tough to answer. We are a clothing/life shop, so depending on season, it is all across the board popular. Right now, in the midst of quarantine life, sweatpants, candles, diffusers, hand sanitizer and body balm.

What are you looking forward to when social distancing ends?
I'm hoping people will recognize it wasn't the corporations that did all they could for their employees—it was small businesses. I have seen so many owners step up to the front line and take on all the tasks of running the business. I myself have kept my employees home, and they are still getting paid. I want them to have a shop and a future to come back to, even if that means running the shop on my own.

Anything you wish to share with the public?
The Stockist launches Sunday night drops of new items, kits, etc. We also offer curbside pickup and local delivery, and our online shop is open 24/7.

How are you passing the time?
I am so busy inside my shop right now.Being the only one means I've taken on the roll of everything, so downtime is me coming home and collapsing.

What are you working on now?
Keeping my business alive and healthy, creating new fun ways for people to be engaged in what I am doing and still feeling a small sense of normalcy.

What's a takeaway from this?
Hard work and determination pay off. Our community is strong, SLC supports local. People will show up for you if you show up for them.

What day is it?
Are there even days any more?

Your parting shot?
My respect for the local community and small-business owners is through the roof right now. It is amazing to see who steps up to the plate. Hats off to all of you!

801.532.3458 | 875 E. 900 South, SLC
thestockistshop.com