Summer Guide 2015 | Summer Guide | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly
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Culture » Summer Guide

Summer Guide 2015

Remember Fun? City Weekly has your Summer 2015 mixtape

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REMEMBER FUN?
Summer Guide 2015

By City Weekly Staff

When the furnace known as "summer" begins to ignite, it's tempting to raid the snack shelves at Trader Joe's and commence binge-watching Unbreakable Kimmie Schmidt, Orange Is the New Black and True Detective. With your swamp cooler roaring full blast, mini-pizzas crisping in the oven and that bottle of Epic Spiral Jetty beading with condensation beside the remote, the fluffy couch is just waiting for your pale, soft bottom to crash down upon it.

It's all too easy to while away the summer indoors, isn't it? But is it really fun? Pleasant, maybe—but it's somehow lacking in the heroic and hair-raising misadventures of your youth.

Sometimes it's necessary to lasso the mindset of childhood, when we basically invented fun. Fun was what happened when we woke up on a summer day and didn't have to mow the lawn, paint the deck, empty the dishwasher or let the dog out. And oftentimes, fun came most easily when we ecaped the confines of home.

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If it's a challenge for you to "remember when," perhaps this issue will jog a memory or two. Let this be the year you check out the newest gut-wrenching ride at a theme park or find yourself idling by (or in) a lazy river. Afterward, snap out your beach towel and recline on an actual sandy beach (yes, there are some in Utah) while listening to your "Summer 2015" mixtape (remember mixtapes? Fun!). Then, experience that elation that comes from finding a shop or eatery serving a dish you enjoyed as a kid, when you discover it tastes just as great now as it did then.

If you can't bring the fun on your own, let someone else make you laugh out loud at a summer play or musical. Or, embrace your inner nomad and explore a park or attraction that few people have heard of before. It's never too late to have fun on a bike; try pedaling your way to high spirits on a pub crawl. Or, prove your hole-in-one prowess with a game of disc golf or putt-putt.

If shopping punches your fun button, check out our list of off-the-wall hangouts and swap meets. Finally, our rosters of festivals and concerts will give you a summer's worth of events where your wild-child self can come out to play.

If all else fails, you can always sit home and do nothing—but only on the Fourth of July!

In the 1960s, young people were urged to "turn on." In summer 2015, we invite you to "turn off." Abandon your flat-screens, your tablets, your smartphones and controllers—whatever devices hold you captive indoors and on the couch—until you've availed yourself at least one excellent adventure described on the following pages.

Play on, kids!

 

 

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THE THRILL IS ON
An amusement-park day brings back old memories while making new ones

By Scott Renshaw
scottr@cityweekly.net

It was right around the third roller coaster of the day—when the car on Lagoon's Jet Star in which I was riding with my daughter dove into a particularly sharp curve, and my neck snapped in a way that didn't seem quite right—that I wondered what the hell I was doing.

The concept seemed like sheer writerly perfection: For a City Weekly Summer Guide with a thematic connection to childhood memories of summer fun, I was going to be re-living a particularly vivid memory. After my eighth-grade graduation in central California, my class visited Six Flags Magic Mountain, the amusement park in nearby Valencia famous for its then-state-of-the-art roller coasters like the Great American Revolution. What would it be like now, more than 30 years later, to spend a day dashing from one thrill ride to another?

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In another spark of inspiration, I invited my 13-year-old daughter, Anna, to accompany me on this visit. Her own eighth-grade class would be making a trip to Lagoon in early June. Perhaps I could see my own decades-removed experience through her eyes. Perhaps a torch would be passed.

There were a few potential bumps in my plan. The years since my last visit to Six Flags Magic Mountain had turned me into an avid fan of Disney parks, with the emphasis more on the atmosphere and theme than thrills. Additionally, I was simply older and creakier, and whatever yearning I ever had for being spun around and turned upside down had dwindled to a level approaching zero.

Nevertheless, Anna and I entered Lagoon on Mother's Day and found the bliss of every amusement park enthusiast: The place was practically empty. Not only were most folks taking their moms out for brunch that day, but the fact that it was Sunday (and pre-season) and gloomy clouds hovered in the air after a string of storms, it made it feel as though we (along with a few hundred other hardy souls) had the place to ourselves. Sure, the big new attraction for 2015—the much-anticipated Cannibal roller coaster—was not yet operational as engineers worked out a few final kinks ahead of the busy summer season. But we'd be able to stroll from one headline attraction to another with less than a five-minute wait.

An amusement park without lines—would it even feel like an amusement park at all?

There was, however, a wee bit of a downside to such an efficient day: No downtime for the old body to settle down between jolting rides. We started with Wicked, the coaster that begins by blasting riders up a 110-foot-tall tower, then plunges them down the other side before corkscrewing, inverting and generally G-force-ifying them for 90 seconds. Then it was over to the wooden piece of amusement-park history simply dubbed Roller Coaster, for all the creaky clickety-clacking and deep dives of one of the classics. And then it was the Jet Star, and that aforementioned certain special pop at the base of my skull.

By that point, it was time to break for lunch—or, as I thought of it, "sit down for a while before I snap in two." We checked out one of the park's "dark rides"—the low-tech haunted-house attraction Terroride—immediately thereafter, but there was no indefinite putting off of a return to the coasters. There was the swooping, surf-like ride of Bombora (perhaps my favorite in its thematic simplicity), and the suspended flight of The Bat. And after a brief drenching break on the undulating Rattlesnake Rapids raft ride, it was back to the double upside-down loops of Colossus: The Fire Dragon, then the hey-you're-about-to-plunge-to-your-death-ha-ha-fooled-you hairpin turns of the Wild Mouse.

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This was the point at which my inner ears, stomach and various joints called it quits. I'd already made it clear to Anna that I wasn't remotely interested in the "spinny rides"—those many attractions whose only purpose appears to be testing one's personal queasiness red-line—and I bailed out on trying the Spider, a rollercoaster where the passengers rotate 360 degrees while the car dips and dives around the track. On some level, I worried that I had failed. I wasn't re-living my carefree adolescence; I was simply reminding myself how far from it I now was.

So instead, Anna and I grabbed a bowl of Dippin' Dots and sat in the shade by the park's carousel. We wandered Lagoon's capacious midway area, and paused for a game of Whac-a-Mole that won her a plush animal. We strolled into the arcade and plunked down a few tokens for a rousing game of air hockey. We discovered a video-game version of Deal or No Deal, where I made my final deal (51 prize tickets) before discovering that I had, in fact, picked the suitcase with the grand prize of 200 tickets. We took a couple of very happy-looking selfies before heading across the freeway to check out the show fountain at nearby Station Park.

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That's the thing you realize about youthful visits to amusement parks, and in a similar way, about any special summer moment: They weren't about the rides. As cool and exciting and dizzying as any individual feat of engineering imagination might be, they were only a delivery system for memories, shared with the people who matter in our lives: friends, significant others, children. Those who fixate on how many rides they can squeeze into a day are missing the point. Being there together is the thing. It's the thing you'll remember, whether you spend the entire day walking around or upside-down.

Around the time this story goes to print, Anna will be making that next visit to Lagoon with her school friends. She was careful to note the location of photo booths where they could take pictures, and where lockers are located to store valuables prior to turbulent or wet rides. They'll have a day that they'll probably recall with a smile 30 years from now, when it has become even clearer that a place like Lagoon delivers its biggest thrills in the joy of shared experience. I'll still have that—long after my neck has returned to normal.

 

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IT'S A WATERFUL LIFE
Utah summers are hot and dry, and that's all the more reason to take the plunge

By Geoff Griffin & Kathleen Curry
comments@cityweekly.net

When a city is named after a body of water, it's not surprising that water activities factor heavily into its recreational possibilities. Salt Lake City's nearby lakes and rivers provide numerous boating, kayaking, fishing and other opportunities. However, Salt Lake City is also a place where you don't need any specialized equipment or know-how to enjoy splashing in the water.

From water slides and hot springs to interactive fountains and running waters, check out these spots where you don't need anything more than a swimsuit and sunscreen and, in some cases, you don't even need money. Just take the plunge, already!

Slip-Slidin' Away
On a hot summer day, there's nothing more refreshing than shooting down a water slide and being launched full-force into a cool pool. The Wasatch Front is loaded with water parks where you can combine your love of water with the need for speed:

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Seven Peaks Salt Lake
Conveniently located close to downtown in Salt Lake City's Glendale neighborhood, the park features 14 water slides, including two face-first mat slides, along with a 400,000-gallon wave pool. 1200 W. 1700 South, Salt Lake City, 801-972-3300, SevenPeaks.com, day pass $24.99.
Farther south, sister park Seven Peaks Provo has 17 slides and features a giant half-pipe and a ride with a 100-foot free-fall. 1330 E. 300 North, Provo, 801-373-8777, SevenPeaks.com, day pass $24.99

Lagoon A Beach
Boasts a series of slides, rivers and water features spread out over six acres. The water park is just one part of the larger Lagoon experience that features exhilarating amusement-park rides (see p.34). 375 Lagoon Lane, Farmington, 801-451-8000, LagoonPark.com, Single Day Passport $49.95 (includes admission to Lagoon Amusement Park)

Cowabunga Bay Water Park
Nothing says "extreme water park" like naming a ride "Mondo." Mondo lives up to its name by offering 1,000 feet of twists and turns through darkness. The Bay also features a gigantic 1,500-gallon bucket—so big, it's visible from the freeway—that periodically spills out onto guests below. 12047 S. State, Draper, 801-553-1000, CowabungaBay.com, day pass $19.99

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Cherry Hill Water Park
Guests who try the Cardiac Canyon River Run at Cherry Hill will experience a ride that, just like a real river, has caverns, waterfalls and sudden drops. 1325 S. Main, Kaysville, 801-451-5379, Cherry-Hill.com, day pass $20

Soak It In
There's a reason songwriter Charles Tobias wrote about the lazy days of summer. Sure, it's a time to get out and play, but it's also a time to kick back, relax, and enjoy soothing natural spring waters:

Crystal Hot Springs
Just an hour north of Salt Lake City off Interstate-15, these ancient springs produce natural waters loaded with all sorts of healthy vitamins and minerals. Temperatures range from very hot (120-134 degrees) to the very cold (65-75 degrees) within 50 feet of each other. There are also two water slides. On the way to and from the springs, you'll pass by Brigham City, which has a number of good restaurants allowing you to turn this into a full day or evening getaway. 8215 Highway 38, Honeyville, 435-279-8104, CrystalHotSprings.net, pool pass $7, pool & slide pass, $10

Lava Hot Springs
Head two hours north out of Salt Lake City, cross the Idaho border and arrive in the small town of Lava Hot Springs, whose five outdoor pools filled with spring waters have no chemicals, sulfur or odor, and range in temperature from 102-112 degrees. In town, there is a large pool and a river, which you can float down on a rented tube. For a small town, Lava offers a surprising number of great dining options and a favorite pastime for Utahns is to drive up for dinner and a soak. You can also make it a quick getaway trip and stay at one of the hotels in town, some of which feature their own access to the spring waters. 430 E. Main, Lava Hot Springs, Idaho, 208-776-5221, LavaHotsprings.com, Monday-Thursday $6, Friday-Sunday and holidays, $10

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Homestead Crater
A visit to the Homestead Crater is both a Utah tradition and an otherworldly experience. Reservations are required to enjoy the 96-degree waters that are found inside a 55-foot tall limestone cone with a hole at the top. 700 Homestead Drive, Midway, 435-657-3840, HomesteadResort.com, 40-minute soak, swim or snorkel, $11 Monday-Thursday, $16 Friday-Sunday

Free Fountains
Many water offerings in Salt Lake City require little or no expense. All you need to do is show up:

Gateway Olympic Snowflake Fountain
The Gateway fountain pays tribute to Salt Lake City's hosting of the 2002 Winter Games. In the 13 years since the Olympics, most kids (and adults) find it a temptation overload to walk past the jets of water shooting up out of the ground to synchronized music without breaking down and deciding to get soaked. 18 N. Rio Grande St., 801-456-0000, ShopTheGateway.com.

Seven Canyons Fountain
For a geography lesson and afternoon of fun all in one, this fountain simulates rivers and streams coming down from the mountains and through to the Great Salt Lake. It was originally created to be something people just looked at, but the sight of water running along channels in an open area became too much for kids to resist splashing around in. A filtration system was added to keep the water clean, and now it's an interactive attraction. While you're at Liberty Park, stroll over to what is known as Liberty Lake (a very generous use of the word "lake") where paddle boats can be rented for $8. Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, 801-972-7800, SLCGov.com

Jordan River Parkway
The Jordan River flows northward more than 50 miles from Utah Lake to the Great Salt Lake. Paralleling the river is the Jordan River Parkway, a trail system that weaves in and out of urban areas, parks and marshy areas throughout Utah, Salt Lake and Davis counties. Hikers, cyclists and equestrians all enjoy the trail, just as canoers, kayakers, and rafters enjoy floating the river. Visit the Bend-in-the-River Open Space at 1030 W. Fremont Ave. and the Jordan River Peace Labyrinth at 1550 S. 1125 West. For a map, visit SLCo.org

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Tanner Fountain
Located on the University of Utah's Marriott Library Plaza, the Tanner Fountain has been beloved by generations of Utes. Rather than shooting water into the air, the fountain's waters cascade down a series of steps. Signs are clearly posted that people should not climb on the fountain, but children and college students ignore them. After all, if you're going to create a cool fountain with steps, you have to expect that there will be climbing. Utah.edu

A River Runs Through It
Sometimes the best way to experience water on a summer day is simply to stroll along next to a creek or stream, have a picnic in the shade as water rolls by, and interact with the riparian wildlife. Salt Lake City offers a number of experiences of this type:

Sugarhouse Park
Feeding bread to the resident seagulls, ducks and geese at Sugarhouse Park is a long-standing tradition. The whole reason Salt Lake City survived its infancy is because seagulls saved the Mormon pioneers and their crops from swarming crickets. Don't begrudge the gulls a crust of bread! Thanks to the addition of The Draw, which opened in the summer of 2014, visitors can now walk west out of Sugarhouse Park under 1300 East to emerge in Hidden Hollow. Here they can enjoy walking or sitting by the ravine that runs through the area. There are also various interpretive signs describing the area's bat population, and telling the history of how Utah's sugarbeet industry gave Sugar House its name. 1400 E. 2100 South, 385-468-7275, SugarhousePark.org

Memory Grove
Another spot to enjoy running water is Memory Grove, where City Creek comes trickling towards downtown Salt Lake City amid beautifully landscaped grounds and historical buildings. 300 N. Canyon Road, 801-972-7800, SLCParks.gov.

City Creek Center
If the Great Outdoors isn't your thing, consider sitting creekside at City Creek Mall's 1,200 foot stream featuring six separate fountains, rippling pools, ponds and waterfalls. With aquatic plants and trout, the creek almost seems like the real thing. But if you think it is, you need to get out more. 50 S. Main, 801-521-2012, ShopCityCreekCenter.com

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Drink Up
Artesian Well Park
The artesian well sitting on this quarter-acre spot is listed as a city park, but the main reason people flock here is to fill up jugs with the water that constantly flows from an ancient well. Diehards won't drink anything else, due to its delicious taste. Legend has it that Brigham Young commissioned this park and even blessed the well that it would forever produce water. Of course, he may not have foreseen that 21st-century beer hobbyists would find these waters perfect for brewing their suds. 500 E. 800 South, SLCGov.com

When Brother Brigham led the Mormon pioneers here on July 24, 1847, they looked down from the mouth of Emigration Canyon on a desert valley that had one tree and a huge lake filled with salt water. Finding a source of fresh water was the first order of business. Once they were able to get the waters flowing, they made the desert, as predicted in Isaiah 35:1, "blossom like a rose." Water is what allowed a patch of desert to turn into a thriving city, and water keeps our city thriving. Drink up, Salt Lake!

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SAND TRAPS
Sink your toes into Utah's sandy beaches

By Stephen Dark
sdark@cityweekly.net

The yen for beach life for city-dwellers in land-locked Utah can be overpowering at times, particularly in those summer months when it seems the closest you can get to the seaside is watching oversize seagulls pecking at garbage in parking lots and tar "beaches" on rooftops. Thanks to the wide variety of reservoirs and lakes across the Beehive State, that itch to throw down a towel and then wade out into still waters can easily be scratched. And you don't have to travel far to do it.

Let's take the man-made options first. In some cases, a beach amounts to little more than land near water. Climb up the winding path at the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon to Bell Canyon Reservoir in Sandy on any sunny weekend, and the sight that greets you at the southern end of the Salt Lake Valley is a gorgeous stretch of water and mountainous terrain. Wend your way around the water's edge, and you'll find spots of land occupied by families on blankets picnicking, or sitting on rocks with their feet in the water, enjoying their views of the tree-lined water's edge and the ducks.

Just across the valley from Bell Canyon in Herriman is an even better example of a beach in Utah, although it's one that's so hidden away in the 'burbs, it takes a little time to find it. Follow Bangerter Highway towards Riverton and Herriman and then turn west on 13400 South. From there, it's a matter of wending your way up through a residential neighborhood of McMansions almost to the top of South Ashland Ridge Drive to be greeted by the black gates of Blackridge Reservoir and a sign, that says "Swim at your own risk."

Blackridge is very 'beach'-like. Essentially, it's a large round pool, with one side walled in by boulders and the other a sandy beach with grass and sheltered tables. Walk the beach, and the feel of sand between your toes brings back vivid childhood memories of half-burying a family member or building sandcastles—which makes it all the more surreal, given the suburban location.

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Other man-sculpted beach spots within an hour or so drive from downtown Salt Lake City include a reservoir in Deer Creek State Park just outside of Heber City in Heber Valley on Highway 189 and the crystal waters of Pineview Reservoir near Ogden, just off Highway 39.

The closest you can get to a natural beach—at least for Salt Lake Valley residents—is Bridger Bay on the northern edge of Antelope Island. It's a two-mile long stretch of white sand looking out onto the salt-laden waters of the Great Salt Lake.

On holidays and weekends, the line of cars coming from Syracuse to get onto Antelope Island could mean as much as a half-hour wait. But the payoff, at least at Bridger Bay, is a stunning vista of undulating mountains mirrored perfectly in the blue waters and the kind of incipient beach life you might expect at any sea resort.

While some picnic in their cars, families with small children traverse the metal tracks down to a long stretch of muddy sand and stone, slender sea gulls fighting in the air above them. A 10- to 15-minute walk from the parking lot brings you to the water's edge. Adults and children with rolled up trouser legs wade out into the waters, as Mexican dance music from a young woman's iPod drifts across the white expanse.

One man with a metal detector searches for buried treasure, while another flies a kite, to his young son's delight. There is a similar relaxed look on everyone's faces as they gaze out over the saline lake, caught up in nostalgia for their own childhood, or simply marveling at how beach life could exist in the desert.

Bridger Bay Beach offers covered tables, the Island Buffalo Grill—a fast-food eatery with buffalo and hamburgers on the menu—and showers to wash off the sand after an afternoon of gently floating in the lake's calm embrace.

If you're looking to get farther away from Salt Lake City, check out Willard Bay State Park, near Brigham City. Or, heading south, you'll find popular beach spots, such as Lake Powell and Flaming Gorge—with their majestic red-rock terrain—while Hurricane offers at Sand Hollow State Park, a sandstone landscape cradling sandy beaches and warm blue waters.

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A SUMMER PLACE
The delicious flavors of summers past

By Ted Scheffler
comments@cityweekly.net
Photos by Niki Chan

It's summertime, and I'm in the back seat of a hot car, playing "slug bug" with my sisters. Each time we see a Volkswagen Beetle on the highway we yell, "Slug bug!" and the first one to spot the Beetle gets to slug the others in the arm. My parents are both smoking. It's stuffy and cramped, and well before the days of in-car air conditioning. We've been hostages in the car since about 3 or 4 a.m.; on road trips, my father always wants to get "an early start."

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My mom spots a sign for Stuckey's—home of the famous Stuckey's Pecan Log Roll—and we stop for an early lunch. It is a revelation. I eat the first restaurant-made grilled-cheese sandwich of my life. And what are those things next to it? French fries! Two incredible discoveries in one memorable meal. Today, I eschew most professionally made grilled-cheese sandwiches, preferring to eat homemade. Unless, that is, I find myself in the vicinity of a Melty Way (MeltyWay.com). Then I treat myself to a taste of gooey nostalgia.

It's summertime, and my dad and I have driven—well, he's driven—from where our family lives, in Seville, Spain, to Torremolinos on the Costa del Sol. We arrive at night, and for reasons I don't recall, I choose to sleep under the car on the beach while my dad sleeps in it. The next day, Dad takes me to a chiringuito—one of the small beachfront bar/cafes that serve cold beer and hot tapas. My dad orders a beer for himself and a Coca-Cola for me, along with gambas: a small plate (my introduction to tapas) of fresh shrimp wrapped in serrano ham, grilled and served in a garlicky sauce. These are flavors I'll never forget. But, if I need a reminder, I order the gambas con bacon at Cafe Madrid (5244 S. Highland Drive, 801-273-0837, CafeMadrid.net).

It's summertime, and we're on the road again. We've returned stateside from Europe and are headed to sunny California, where we'll put down stakes for a couple years. Somewhere in the Midwest, we stop for dinner at a Howard Johnson's where, at my mom's insistence, I discover what would become one of my favorite edible treats on the planet: fried clams. Years later, I would learn that my culinary hero, Jacques Pépin, was hired in 1961—after working for the likes of Charles de Gaulle—by Howard Johnson himself to update the menus at the chain of roadside restaurants. He stayed with HoJo's for nearly a decade.

According to Pépin—whom I had the honor of studying with briefly in New York City—the fried clams were made from the tongues of huge sea clams (the rest of the clam was used for chowder). Since my childhood introduction to fried clams, I've eaten them in dozens of places, from the Lobster Trap on Cape Cod (where you can get them with the bellies intact), to Gladstone's on the beach in Malibu, Calif. On Long Beach Island, off the coast of New Jersey—where I now spend hot and humid summers with my son, Hank—we eat piles of fried clams at The Clam Bar. One future hot summer, he'll teach my future grandchild to love clams as much as we do; food ways are passed from generation to generation. For the best fried clams in Utah, you'll need to head up to Park City, surprisingly—to Cena Ristorante and Lounge in The Chateaux at Deer Valley (7815 Royal Street, 435-940-2200, The-Chateaux.com).

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It's summertime in Morocco, and I'm riding a camel. I'm in Morocco to play in an all-star Little League tournament against other teams from around the region (yes, there is baseball in Morocco). My mom is a chaperone for our team, and our guide is escorting us through the colorful chaos that is a Moroccan bazaar in Rabat. I buy a souvenir fez. At some point, the guide leads us through an alley and into a small house filled with exotic smells.

A family that is helping to host our Little League team has invited a few of us to lunch, and I think it's cool we get to eat with our hands—no utensils. We are treated to a sweet-and-savory (a term I'd only come to know decades later) Moroccan dish—a sort of phyllo-dough pie filled with chicken, nuts and spices, and dusted with powdered sugar and cinnamon. Many years later, during college, I'd come across this amazing dish again at a Boulder restaurant called Mataam Fez, and would learn that it's called pastilla (aka bastilla, bisteeya, bstilla and b'stilla). It's still one of the most remarkable dishes I've ever encountered—and now when I want to remember those Moroccan flavors, I check into Cedars of Lebanon (152 E. 200 South, 801-364-4096, CedarsOfLebanonRestaurant.com) for its delicious pastilla. Alas, our Little League team ultimately lost the tournament, but discovering pastilla still makes me a winner.

It's summertime in the late 1960s, and my mom is dragging me and my sisters around Manhattan. She loves the city, and my father won't go near it. She takes us to a place for lunch called an "automat." It's a big, lunchroom-type eatery where customers plunk money into coin-operated slots that dispense food—stuff like sandwiches, coffee, pie slices and even soups and stews—which await behind a small glass window.

Decades later, when I moved to New York City on a hot summer day in August, I'd learn that the place was called Horn & Hardart, on East 42nd Street. It's closed now. I'd moved to New York City to attend grad school, and quickly found my way (via a guide called New York on $15 a Day) to Manganaro's Hero Boy in Hell's Kitchen. There, I relished the massive, inexpensive hero sandwiches (said to be invented there), piled high with fresh-sliced meats, cheeses and extras like pepperoncini. Today, when I want a terrific bang-for-the-buck hero (or hoagie or sub or grinder or torpedo or whatever you want to call it), I go to Grove Market & Deli (1906 S. Main, 801-467-8860, GroveMarketDeli.com) for the Big John, to the original Granato's (1391 S. 300 West, 801-486-5643) to enjoy their Godfather, or to Caputo's Market & Deli downtown (314 W. 300 South, 801-531-8669, CaputosDeli.com) to get my lips around The Caputo, with prosciutto, mortadella, salami, provolone and fixings.

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It's summertime, and I'm in Belgium eating steamed mussels. They're extraordinary, and not just because I've never eaten mussels in any form before. It's because they are plump, juicy and bathed in a silky broth marinières, with a side of spectacular french fries to boot. It's a warm summer night, and I'm dining at one of Brussels' oldest restaurants, Aux Armes de Bruxelles. It's one of the simplest, yet most memorable, meals I'll ever enjoy. Since then, I've gone on to make many batches of my own moules marinières, but when I'm too lazy to cook or just want to enjoy a good restaurant meal, I order the moules marinières at The Paris Bistro (1500 S. 1500 East, 801-486-5585, TheParis.net) or at J&G Grill in Deer Valley's St. Regis (2300 Deer Valley Drive East, 435-940-5760, JGGrillDeerCrest.com).

It's summertime, and I'm in Brazil—which means it's December. During a break from graduate school, I'm honoring my obsession for the Brazilian martial art of capoeira by flying down to Rio de Janeiro to study under Mestre Camisa, the Bruce Lee of Brazilian capoeira. There, I discover the carnivorous phenomenon that is churrasco at the churrascarias serving skewered, grilled meats in an endless, all-you-can-eat rotation (rodizio).

Eventually, I roam north with my capoeirista compatriots and eat at seaside shacks in Salvador, Bahia, where I buy acarajé—a mashed-and-fried bean concoction—from women attired in native garb. I enjoy it on the beach between capoeira sessions, along with other delectable Salvadoran dishes like vatapá, moqueca and, on Saturdays, feijoada. Although the cuisine of northern Brazil is hard to come by here, there are plenty of places to get the churrasco experience: Tucanos Brazilian Grill (162 S. 400 West, 801-456-2550, Tucanos.com), Texas de Brazil (50 S. Main, 385-232-8070, TexasDeBrazil.com), Rodizio Grill (600 S. 700 East, Trolley Square, 801-220-0500, RodizioGrill.com), Tushar Express (1078 W. South Jordan Parkway, 801-446-6644, TusharExpress.com) and Braza Grill (5927 S. State, 801-506-7788, BrazaGrillUtah.com), for example.

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It's summertime, and I'm spending it in Oaxaca, Mexico. It's the Reagan 1980s, and I'm much in need of a mental-health break and some separation from Reagan's America. I'm awakened before dawn every morning by the crowing of the rooster that resides at the house next to my little bungalow in Oaxaca's Colonia Linda Vista, where my anthropology mentor and friend, Michael, has procured me an apartment for $40 per week, including maid service.

The city of Oaxaca is landlocked, and I crave the ocean in summer. So, I drive south to Puerto Escondido and check into the Hotel Santa Fe, overlooking Zicatela beach and its famous Mexican Pipeline, which draws serious surfers from around the globe. It is here, at a seaside shack—the name long forgotten—that I come every day for fish tacos. If memory serves, they were made from local red snapper or sea bass. Today, when I need an escape from reality and I'm jonesing for South of the Border flavors and ambiance, I head to Lone Star Taqueria (2265 E. Fort Union Boulevard, 801-944-2300, LoneStarTaqueria.com) and order up their excellent fish tacos.

It's summertime, and I can't wait to discover what flavors and adventures this summer will offer. So far, summers have treated me very well.

 

 

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SUMMER WHITES
It's OK to put on these wines after Memorial Day

By Ted Scheffler
comments@cityweekly.net

With summer's close approach, it's time to pack away the dark flannels and change into summer whites. That goes for wine as well as attire. The heavy, bruising wines that got us through winter won't do for spring and summer concerts, picnics, barbecues and such. So, it's time to turn to lighter, refreshing, warm-weather white wines. Here are a few of my favorites, in part due to their bang-for-the-buck pricing. All will partner nicely with a wide variety of summertime cuisine.

During a recent dinner at Kobe Japanese Restaurant, we sipped glasses of a Spanish Rueda called Sitios de Bodega Con Class ($11.99). This is a heavenly white wine that worked wonders alongside everything from salty ramen to clean-tasting sashimi and spicy maki rolls. It's Sauvignon Blanc, with that varietal's grapefruit, guava and gooseberry flavors, blended with Verdejo and Vura, which lend roundness to the wine along with pineapple and melon notes.

Sauvignon Blanc also gets top billing in Château Bonnet Blanc ($12.49), a crisp, summery wine from France's Entre-Deux-Mers appellation. This classic white Bordeaux blend of 52 percent Sauvignon Blanc, 33 percent Sémillon and 15 percent Muscadelle is made by André Lurton, whose Bonnet vineyards date back to the 16th century. I saw a review of this wine wherein the writer described Château Bonnet Blanc as "nervous, expressive and intelligent." I can't begin to tell you what that means; all I'll say is that it's a well-balanced blend, with tropical fruit flavors and citrusy aromas. It's a terrific wine to sip by itself, but also a good partner for seafood and shellfish, chicken, salads, most veggies and almost anything else except strong cheeses and rich, heavy meats and sauces—an ideal picnic choice.

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Although it's a bit of a splurge, a California white wine I like a lot is Curtis Heritage Blanc ($18.65), a great example of the Rhone-style wines made by Santa Barbara County's Curtis Winery. Head winemaker Chuck "Calypso" Carlson makes his wines in a fruit-forward style, and Heritage Blanc is no exception. It's a delicious blend of 60 percent Viognier and 40 percent Roussanne. The Viognier is fermented in stainless steel, which helps to maintain the Viognier's prototypical perfumed-fruit aromas and flavors. Meanwhile, Carlson partially ferments and ages the Roussanne in neutral French-oak barrels, which lends body and depth. It might be made in California, but the first sip will transport you to France.

Another great California wine with the same DNA—Viognier and Roussanne—is Atrea "The Choir" ($16.01). It's elegant and lovely, with Viognier's apricot aromas, plus honey notes from Roussanne. Stone fruits dominate on the palate. Quite simply, this is a knockout wine, and one of my go-to favorites.

I first learned of Italy's Maculan Pino & Toi from restaurateurs Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich, who are big fans of this affordable wine, priced here at a mere $11.99. It's a lovely little white wine from the foot of the Italian Alps in Veneto that's perfect for springtime on the patio—a blend of 60 percent Tai (formerly called Tocai in Italy), 25 percent Pinot Bianco and 15 percent Pinot Grigio. It's intensely aromatic, with frilly floral aromas, but also crisp and clean on the palate—a nice match for vegetable risotto, white-sauced pizzas or grilled chicken.

Bubbly is always appropriate for summer sipping, and one of my favorite sparkling wines—perfect with a wide range of foods or just solo—is Roederer Estate Anderson Valley Brut ($25). It's slightly sweet and sensational on a sunny day.

 

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SHOW ME THE FUNNY
The summer's theater offerings promise mirth, merriment and more than a little drama

Compiled by Derek Edwards
comments@cityweekly.net

Like the Bard, you'll soon be telling yourself that "this summer's lease hath all too short a date." Heavy on the laughs, this summer's stage offerings will leave you and your split sides wanting more. Featuring a number of Shakespeare and Broadway favorites, with some locally written offerings in the mix, this wide range of productions caters to all tastes. This season's biggest splash looks to be the long-awaited Utah appearance of The Book of Mormon at the Capitol Theatre; the smash hit musical from the creators of TV show South Park has already sold out. Those who didn't get their tickets can seek similar comedic consolation in this year's production of Saturday's Voyeur. Regular theatergoers will certainly find the annual pilgrimage to the Utah Shakespeare Festival in Cedar City worth the trip, and Tuacahn's big-budget Disney productions similarly continue to beckon to families looking for worthwhile entertainment. Whether your bent leans to community productions or to big-time Broadway musicals, there's sure to be a summer performance geared to your liking.

Through June 6
Into the Hoods: A Fractured Fairy Tale
Desert Star Playhouse
4861 S. State, Murray
801-266-2600
DesertStar.biz

Mary Poppins
Brigham's Playhouse
25 N. 300 West, Washington
435-251-8000
BrighamsPlayhouse.com

The Revengers
The Off Broadway Theatre
272 S. Main
801-355-4628
TheOBT.org

Through June 20
Big Fish
Hale Center Theater Orem
225 W. 400 North, Orem
801-226-8600
HaleTheater.org

Thoroughly Modern Millie
The Empress Theatre
9104 W. 2700 South, Magna
801-347-7373

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EmpressTheatre.com
Through July 2015
The Comedy of Errors
& Julius Caesar
Various Utah venues
707-722-7529
GrassrootsShakespeare.com

June 4-June 13
Princess Academy
BYU Department of Theatre
Franklin S. Harris Fine Arts Center, Provo
801-422-2981
Arts.BYU.edu

June 5-June 20
Disney & Cameron Mackintosh's Mary Poppins
Scera Shell Outdoor Theatre
699 S. State, Orem
801-225-2787
Scera.org

June 5-June 27
Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Heritage Community Theatre
2505 S. Highway 89, Brigham City
435-723-8392
HeritageTheatreUtah.com

June 5-Aug. 1
Disney's The Little Mermaid
Hale Centre Theatre
3333 S. Decker Lake Drive West Valley City
801-984-9000
HaleCentreTheatre.org

June 11-June 14
The Foreigner
Egyptian Theatre
328 Main, Park City
435-649-9371
EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

June 11-June 21
You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown
Babcock Theatre
300 S. University St.
801-581-7100
Theatre.Utah.edu

June 11-June 27
Echo Writer's Showcase: 3 Plays From Local Playwrights
The Echo Theatre
15 N. 100 East St., Provo
801-375-2181
TheEchoTheatre.com

June 11-July 30
Noises Off
Caine Lyric Theatre
28 W. Center St., Logan
435-797-8022
Arts.USU.edu/Lyric

June 11-Aug. 22
Grease'd: Happy Days Are Here Again!
Desert Star Playhouse
4861 S. State, Murray
801-266-2600
DesertStar.biz

June 12-June 20
Oliver: The Musical
Rose Wagner Center
138 W. 300 South
801-355-2787
ArtTix.org

June 12-June 27
Alice in Wonderland Jr.
The Old Barn Community Theatre
3605 Bigler Road, Collinston
435-458-2276
OldBarn.org

Treasure Island: A Modern Day Musical
Draper Historic Theatre
12366 S. 900 East, Draper
801-572-4144
DraperTheatre.org

June 12-July 3
Harvey
Centerpoint Legacy Theatre

525 N. 400 West, Centerville
801-298-1302
CenterpointTheatre.org

June 12-July 25
1776: America's Musical
Terrace Plaza Playhouse
99 E. 4700 South, Ogden
801-393-0070
TerracePlayhouse.com

June 12-Oct. 17
Disney's Beauty and the Beast
Tuacahn Amphitheatre
1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins
800-746-9882
Tuacahn.org

June 13-Oct. 16
Disney's When You Wish
Tuacahn Amphitheatre
1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins
800-746-9882
Tuacahn.org

June 16-July 11
Anne of Green Gables
Brigham's Playhouse
25 N. 300 West, Washington
435-251-8000
BrighamsPlayhouse.com

June 17-July 25
Joseph Smith: Praise to the Man
Brigham's Playhouse
25 N. 300 West, Washington
435-251-8000
BrighamsPlayhouse.com

June 17-July 31
Last Train to Nibroc
Caine Lyric Theatre
28 W. Center St., Logan
435-797-8022
Arts.USU.edu/Lyric

June 18-July 19
The King and I
Centerpoint Legacy Theatre
525 N. 400 West, Centerville
801-298-1302
CenterpointTheatre.org

June 19-July 18
The Compleat Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)
The Off Broadway Theatre
272 S. Main, SLC
801-355-4628
TheOBT.org

June 24-Aug. 1
The Mystery of Edwin Drood: The Musical
Caine Lyric Theatre
28 W. Center St., Logan
435-797-8022

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Even with The Book of Mormon's Broadway buzz, this year's locally-produced Saturday's Voyeur promises to be top among the best theatrical satires of contemporary life in Utah. A comedic catharsis of all things local, a new variant of the show has been produced almost annually since 1978.

Arts.USU.edu/Lyric

June 24-Aug. 30
Saturday's Voyeur 2015
Salt Lake Acting Company
168 W. 500 North
801-363-7522
SaltLakeActingCompany.org

June 25-Oct. 31

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The Utah Shakespeare Festival is among the crown jewels of Utah stagecraft. As in past years, the New American Playwrights Project will be hosting productions of entirely new plays alongside the superb lineup of more traditional offerings from the Bard and Broadway. This year's new plays (Affluence, Caesar's Blood, Closure) will feature dark comedy and intense drama. Those looking for more farcical fare will find themselves satiated by world-class productions of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew and the revivalist favorite Charley's Aunt.

King Lear, The Taming of the Shrew, Henry IV: Part Two, Amadeus, Charley's Aunt, South Pacific, Dracula, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Affluence, Caesar's Blood, Closure
Utah Shakespeare Festival
351 W. Center St. Cedar City
435-586-7878
Bard.org

July 1-July 29
And Then There Were None
Caine Lyric Theatre
28 W. Center St., Logan
435-797-8022
Arts.USU.edu/Lyric

July 2-July 18
Joseph & The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat
Scera Shell Outdoor Theatre
745 S. State, Orem
801-225-2787
Scera.org

July 2-Aug. 15
Into the Woods
Hale Center Theater Orem
225 W. 400 North, Orem
801-226-8600
HaleTheater.org

July 3-July 25
1776|
The Empress Theatre
9104 W. 2700 South, Magna
801-347-7373
EmpressTheatre.com

July 3-July 26
West Side Story
Egyptian Theatre
328 Main, Park City
435-649-9371
EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

July 8-Aug. 7
La Bohème
Ellen Eccles Theatre
43 S. Main, Logan
800-262-0074
ArtTix.org

July 9-July 19th
Twelfth Night
Babcock Theatre
300 S. University St.
801-581-7100
Theatre.Utah.edu

July 9-Aug. 7
Rodgers & Hammerstein's Carousel
Ellen Eccles Theatre
43 S. Main, Logan
800-262-0074
ArtTix.org

July 10-Aug. 8
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Ellen Eccles Theatre
43 S. Main, Logan
800-262-0074

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ArtTix.org

July 11-Aug. 8
Man of La Mancha
Ellen Eccles Theatre
43 S. Main, Logan
800-262-0074
ArtTix.org

July 23-Aug. 15
The Wizard of Oz
Sundance Summer Theatre
8841 N. Alpine Loop Road, Sundance
866-734-4428
SundanceResort.com

July 27-Aug. 8
Nephi & The Sword of Laban
Grand Theatre
1575 S. State
801-957-3322
The-Grand.org

July 28-Aug. 9

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While The Book of Mormon's billing in Utah may have hit a little too close to home for some, for the less-religiously invested the nine-time Tony Award winning musical promises to be an outrageously funny visit from one of the most lauded Broadway productions in recent years. The long-anticipated 16-night run sold out the first night tickets went on sale. Satirizing Utah's most cherished belief system, "God's favorite musical" promises to leave Zion nourished and strengthened with loud laughter. (The play contains explicit language.)

The Book of Mormon
Capitol Theatre
50 W. 200 South
801-355-2787
ArtTix.org

July 31-Aug. 15
Crazy For You
Scera Shell Outdoor Theatre
745 S. State, Orem
801-225-2787
Scera.org

Aug. 1-Aug. 15
Into The Woods
The Old Barn Community Theatre
3605 Bigler Road, Collinston
435-458-2276
OldBarn.org

Aug. 4-Aug. 29
Bridge to Terabithia
Brigham's Playhouse
25 N. 300 West, Washington
435-251-8000
BrighamsPlayhouse.com

Aug. 5-Sept. 12
Fiddler on the Roof
Brigham's Playhouse
25 N. 300 West, Washington
435-251-8000
BrighamsPlayhouse.com

Aug. 7-Aug. 29
The Wiz
The Empress Theatre
9104 W. 2700 South, Magna
801-347-7373
EmpressTheatre.com

Aug. 7-Sept. 12
Jurassic Park City
The Off Broadway Theatre
272 S. Main
801-355-4628
TheOBT.org

Aug. 7-Sept. 19
Seussical
Terrace Plaza Playhouse
99 E. 4700 South, Ogden
801-393-0070
TerracePlayhouse.com

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Aug. 7-Oct. 15
Sister Act
Tuacahn Amphitheatre
1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins
800-746-9882
Tuacahn.org

Aug. 10-Sept. 5
Guys and Dolls
Centerpoint Legacy Theatre
525 N. 400 West, Centerville
801-298-1302
CenterpointTheatre.org

Aug. 12-Oct. 3
Oklahoma!
Hale Centre Theatre
3333 S. Decker Lake Drive West Valley City
801-984-9000
HaleCentreTheatre.org

Aug. 13-Sept. 21
West Side Story
St. George Musical Theater
212 N. Main, St. George
435-628-8755
SGMusicalTheater.com

Aug. 20-Aug. 23
They're Playing Our Song
Egyptian Theatre
328 Main, Park City
435-649-9371
EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

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Aug. 21-Sept. 12
Shrek: The Musical
Heritage Community Theatre
2505 S. Highway 89, Perry
435-723-8392
HeritageTheatreUtah.com

Aug. 21-Sept. 26
The Diary of Anne Frank
Hale Center Theater Orem
225 W. 400 North, Orem
801-226-8600
HaleTheater.org

Aug. 27-Nov. 7
Star Wards: These Are Not The Elders You're Looking For
Desert Star Playhouse
4861 S. State, Murray
801-266-2600
DesertStar.biz

Sept. 2015
Richard II
Various Utah venues
707-722-7529
GrassrootsShakespeare.com

Sept. 4-Sept. 27
Sophocles' Electra
45th Annual Classical Greek Theatre Festival
Various Utah venues
801-832-2458
WestminsterCollege.edu/greek_theatre

Sept. 11-Sept. 26
The Crucible
The Echo Theatre
15 N. 100 East St., Provo
801-375-2181
TheEchoTheatre.com

Sept. 11-Oct. 3
The Drowsy Chaperone
The Empress Theatre
9104 W. 2700 South, Magna
801-347-7373
EmpressTheatre.com

Sept. 18-Oct. 3
Fiddler on the Roof
Pioneer Theatre Company
300 S. 1400 East
801-581-6356
PioneerTheatre.org

Sept. 22-Oct. 31
The Secret Garden
Brigham's Playhouse
25 N. 300 West
Washington
435-251-8000
BrighamsPlayhouse.com

Sept. 25-Oct. 27
The Glass Menagerie
Centerpoint Legacy Theatre
525 N. 400 West
Centerville
801-298-1302
CenterpointTheatre.org

Sept. 25-Oct. 31
Breaking Vlad
The Off Broadway Theatre
272 S. Main
801-355-4628
TheOBT.org

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ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS
Check out some of Utah's often-overlooked wonders

By Katherine Pioli
comments@cityweekly.net

Road trips are a summer classic—and, from north to south, Utah has some great destinations for any adventurer behind the wheel. Visit roadside attractions with real local flavor. Dip into Mormon history. Contemplate works of art. Travel the back ways and discover spectacular scenery. For travelers looking for places that tend to be far from the madding crowd, here are seven sights worth exploring.

Kodachrome Basin State Park—near Tropic on Highway 12
Inspired by the basin's color and shadow, the red-rock spires against seamless blue skies, the National Geographic Society, in 1949, gained permission from the Eastman Kodak film company to give the park its imagination-stirring name. Found in a remote south-central part of the state, Kodachrome has few visitors and a geology that tells of Earth's great shifts and changes through time.

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Moqui Caves—Kanab
This kitschy roadside museum, located inside a sandstone cave, houses a collection of arrowheads, American Indian pottery, rocks and minerals from around the world. But, the real reason to visit is Lex Chamberlain. Chamberlain's family has owned and operated this attraction for more than 50 years, and Lex personally serves as tour guide and storyteller giving visitors his own account of local history—from the Anasazi to the Mormon pioneers—to "acquaint visitors with the experience of the inhabitants of southern Utah."

Best Friends Animal Shelter—Kanab
Just down the street from the Moqui Caves is Angel Canyon, home of Best Friends, a beautiful no-kill sanctuary for all types of unwanted, abused and abandoned animals—pigs, horses, rabbits, dogs, cats and others. The sanctuary has, since the early '90s, operated as a nonprofit charity. The work they do to promote animal welfare is unmatched. If you have children, take them to Best Friends; they will think they've died and gone to heaven.

Cove Fort—near Beaver on Interstate 15
Geologically speaking, Utah has a lot of history on display. The state's pioneer past, on the other hand, isn't etched in stone and could fade away over time. Cove Fort is one rare example of pioneer history brought to life in the present. Built in 1867 as a safe haven for traveling Mormons, the stone fort is beautifully preserved and authentically furnished. Tour guides will show you around, and it's a great quick stop along Interstate 15.

Topaz Museum—Delta
In the dry flatlands of Utah's Great Basin desert lie the remains of a shameful piece of American history, the crumbling barracks of Topaz, once a World War II Japanese-American internment camp that housed 11,212 American citizens. The new Topaz Museum presents its inaugural exhibit this summer. The collections include photographs documenting camp life and artworks created by internees at the Topaz Art School. Housed in a restored barrack, the museum seeks to preserve the site and serve as a reminder of that infamous moment in our history when civil rights were so blatantly discarded.

Utah's Little Grand Canyon—San Rafael Swell
An uplift in the Earth's crust created central Utah's spectacular San Rafael Swell 40 million years ago, but it was the Swell's subsequent erosion that gave life to Utah's Little Grand Canyon. Located in the Swell's north end, 20 dirt-road miles from Castle Dale at the Wedge Overlook, the canyon's sheer 1,200-foot cliffs reveal a panorama of winding water, layered buttes, domes and spires that exemplifies the southern desert.

Golden Spike—near Corrine & Highway 83
It's pretty cool to stand on the spot where, on May 10, 1869, the final spike was driven in linking the First Transcontinental Railroad. A visitor center now stands where the Promontory train station and ticket office once stood. While the building doesn't house the actual Golden Spike—it is kept at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University—it does have a few exhibits and ranger presentations.

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DAYS OF YORE
Take the backroads to see glimpses of Utah's railroad glory days

by Eric S. Peterson
epeterson@cityweekly.net

On May 10, 1869, a golden spike nailed together two lines of the Transcontinental Railroad that bound the nation together at Promontory Point in northern Utah. Thousands of miles of iron rails snaked through flat sea-like prairies to the east. To the west, rail lines found a foothold in the rocky Sierra Nevada mountains after thousands of Chinese immigrants dynamited a precipitous path through sheer cliff faces and dizzying ravines.

Any Beehive State history buff making a sojourn north ought to visit the Golden Spike National Historic Site in Box Elder County. No trip through Utah's railroad past is complete without venturing a little farther off the beaten path to visit the remnants of towns that blossomed in the late 1800s only to disappear a century later.

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The Park Valley area of northern Box Elder County is home to what remains of railroad settlements that once hosted residences, hotels, saloons and some of the most vital segments of the Transcontinental Railroad. Prior to the rise of the railroad, the United States were united only by a loose patchwork of stagecoach trails and disjointed riverways.

A disclaimer: Don't expect to see a vacant town when visiting ghost towns. You're not likely to wander into some decrepit saloon and find the skeleton of a bartender clutching a dusty bottle of hooch in his bony hand. It's more about finding the slightest remains of civilization, and appreciating how things have disappeared after a way of life has been blown away by the indifferent winds of history.

For those heading into Park Valley, there are several interesting destinations not too far from Promontory Point. Lucin was an important water stop for the train's steam engines. Nowadays, it is said that a grain cellar remains, as does a small reservoir.

The town of Terrace, on the east side of the valley, still has remnants of a roundhouse and a switchyard, while Kelton was once a crucial Transcontinental Railroad stop. Founded in April 1869, just a month before the golden spike ceremony, Kelton thrived thanks to the railroad, and was a spot where fine hotels, saloons and gambling halls sprang up. The town even boasted a post office and a telephone exchange.

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The town lived and died by the rails and survived only as long as locomotives rolled past. It even survived, in 1934, a 6.6 magnitude earthquake, considered the strongest to ever hit Utah. While shaking homes, splitting fissures and creating chasms through the ground, the quake also took two lives. The town's death knell came in the '40s, when the Southern Pacific Railroad dismantled the line and handed the hardware over to aid the war effort. Today, few traces of the town remain, other than its cemetery (pictured above, left and right).

The trip to Kelton from Salt Lake City is also mostly on decent paved roads—except for the final 10 miles or so, which is a fair but bumpy dirt and gravel road in good weather. It's a beautiful drive, but damned desolate. The roads have all the delightful hallmarks one could hope for in a good country drive: lush rolling farmlands, crows perched on cattle gate posts, road signs chewed up by buckshot and surly-looking kids on 10 speeds waiting impatiently for you to pass so they can cross the road.

Little remains of the town but a stone square of foundation and a pioneer cemetery, fenced off and holding up a handful of wilted posts and cracked headstones.

If the wind is low, you might just get to enjoy that wonderful yet terrifying feeling bubbling through your blood that you're just a flea in a great sandbox, standing over the final resting spot of your flea forebearers. Now a century later, those who have gone before are just sand and grit beneath your feet.

Directions from Salt Lake City to Kelton: Travel north on Interstate 15 and keep left to Interstate 84 toward Boise, take Exit Utah-30 for Park Valley/Elko and head left toward Park Valley for roughly 25 miles before taking a left at the sign for Kelton, follow this dirt road for seven miles to the old Kelton cemetery.

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LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL
Biking doesn’t have to be an uphill climb. Remember when it was awesome?

By Allison Oligschlaeger
comments@cityweekly.net

In the endless crusade to burn calories, it's tempting to turn once-enjoyable activities into grueling challenges. Sunday mornings once whiled away on a beach cruiser are now spent sweating it out pedaling up a steep canyon road or on the stationary mount in the basement. The blood, sweat and tears can cloud our vision, making it difficult to see what we enjoyed about biking all those years ago.

Here are some ways you can keep the shiny side up (and the rubber side down!) this summer.

Riding for the Cause
Whether you're riding for fun, fitness or charity, chances are you're not alone. Why not try riding with the neighbor kids again? Casual riders will enjoy the weekly group rides offered by local bike shops, whereas more ambitious cyclists may prefer training groups like Schmos to Pros Cycling (Meetup.com/Schmo-To-Pro-Cycling) and Team Fast Lane (TeamFastLane.com). For particularly passionate peddlers, Salt Lake City offers several cause-focused biking groups, including the Huntsman Cancer Institute's Bonneville Cycling Club, Cycle4aCure and Animal Liberation Racing, a group of endurance athletes dedicated to showcasing the health benefits of a vegan diet. (BCCUtah.org, Cycling4ACure.org, AnimalLiberationRacing.com)

Go the Distance
Satisfy your inner Boy Scout with a biking/camping combo trip led by the Salt Lake Randonneurs (SaltLakeRandos.org). This summer's upcoming randonnees (French for "excursions") range from 200-1,200 km, lasting up to four days. For a more competitive trek, try Planet Ultra's Hoodoo 500 (Hoodoo500.com), a 500-mile race through three Utah national parks, starting Aug. 28. Racers can compete on a solo bike, tandem bike or relay team.

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Peak Experiences
Maximize your downhill time by taking advantage of Utah's summer resort packages. For a premium, Solitude Mountain Resort, Park City Mountain Resort and Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort all allow guests to haul mountain bikes up their chairlifts. Stick around Sundance Mountain Resort after a biking date for a romantic Full Moon Lift Ride, $28 for two people. (SkiSolitude.com, $10; ParkCityMountain.com, $15; Snowbird.com, half-day $19).

Bikes & Beer
Adult beverage enthusiasts can get in on the action by joining one of several pedal-powered pub crawls. Check out Cutthroat Racing (CutthroatRacing.com), a collaboration between Brewvies, Pie Hole and Uintah Brewpub, or CrankSLC's (CrankSLC.com) weekly bar and taco tour, the Tuesday Night Slow Roll. Already have a drinking team? Book a night out on the Pedal Hopper (PedalHopper.com), a human-powered wagon that can shuttle as many as 16 people from bar to bar.

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Race Ya!
Revisit the schoolyard with Sundance Mountain Resort's weekly bike races. Held alternately at Sundance and Soldier Hollow (SoldierHollow.com), these casual competitions welcome riders of all ages and experience levels. Particularly ambitious amateurs can ride alongside the pros in the Tour of Utah's Ultimate Challenge (TourOfUtah.com), a week-long riding event, Aug. 3-9, that exposes cyclists to the world of professional racing. Cool off with a friendly game of bike polo in Liberty Park, hosted every Sunday by the Beehive Bike Polo Team.

Double Date ... or Not!
Put date night on wheels with a tandem rental from Bingham Cyclery (BinghamCyclery.com) or the SLC Bicycle Company (SLCBike.com)! The team efforts of pedaling, steering and braking make great bonding experiences. If you're looking for something a bit less pedestrian, local bike shops offer several additional variations on bicycles, including unicycles, electric road bikes and the Elliptigo, a mobile elliptical machine designed for those with joint pain or other mobility issues. Utah Home Fitness (UtahHomeFitness.com) offers half-, full- and two-day Elliptigo rentals.

Sharing Your Ride
GREENbike's (GreenBikeSLC.com) ridership increased by 184 percent in 2014, making it the most successful bikeshare program in the country. With more than 150 bikes at 20 different stations, Salt Lake City's newest transportation system continues to expand, making it an increasingly viable option for commuters or people who don't own bikes. Pay as you go or purchase a one-year unlimited pass for $75.

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Pedicabs:
Pedaling on your own power just isn't your speed? No worries. Thanks to Salt Lake City's emerging pedicab industry, you can still enjoy the benefits of zero-emissions wheeled transportation. Flag down a Salt City Cycle Cab (SaltCityCycleCab.com) operator for a pleasant, sustainable ride of up to 60 miles.

Meet a pedicab driver Louis Gasper
Founder/owner of Salt City Cycle Cab

What's your favorite part of driving a pedicab?
Every day is different and has a lot of different challenges. A lot of people come to work and get really bored with whatever they're doing. That monotony isn't found here. Yes, the grind is the same, but the people and the experiences are always unique. You might have a chance to drive Ralph Becker around or get Michael Jordan in your cab.

Do you have a favorite ride memory?
The one that was like, $375 at the end of it? That was memorable. The other memorable rides are the ones to unique places, like 1400 East or outside 2700 South, or things that are halfway through the valley—those are memorable. But I don't know, it's all so much. I've been doing this for 5 1/2 years. How am I supposed to just isolate one fare?

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What do you look for in a rider?
An attitude, a little bit. They can't be taken advantage of. On top of that, somebody who is mechanically inclined—anybody who can bring their own wrench to work and not have me do everything for them is great.

How do you deal with maintenance and repairs?
I am responsible for all my own maintenance. At first, I was sourcing certain things as simple as fixing wheels to other bike shops, but I realized they were just charging me way too much. And as soon as you get into the self-sufficient areas of biking mechanics, you eventually just incorporate that into everything—not just biking, but also welding and making your own metal and parts and batteries. It's an endeavor.

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As someone who bikes for a living, how would you encourage people to get out there and pedal this summer?
Get off your ass, man! Biking changes the world in a way that we can measure with each pedal stroke. It's our responsibility as a community to improve the quality of the lives of others, and if you're not doing what you can by riding a bike—if you're out there driving a gas guzzler—it's time to start."

 

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FROLF & PUTT
A 9-iron isn't always needed for a hole in one

By Robby Poffenberger
comments@cityweekly.net

Try saying "frolf" out loud and with a straight face. Or telling your bros to meet you for a round of "Putt-Putt." Whatever you call 'em, the games are a blast and ideal for playing with friends and family.

For the "go big or go home" folks, these games also can be highly competitive. Disc golf, or "frolf," has its own competitions, discs, regulations and safety rules (because who wants to take a flying Frisbee to the head?). And for those who love their dimply balls and putters, playing a couple rounds at one of the area's elaborately themed miniature-golf courses may prove surprisingly challenging.

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So, go ahead and laugh at the notion of whirling discs and putting at windmills. It's supposed to be fun. But spending your summer playing at the diverse and creatively imagined courses below may bring out the Olympian in you.

Where to Huck & Duck
Roots Disc Golf Course in the Rose Park area is fresh on the scene, officially opening in November 2014. It has a ball-golf-course feel to it because, well, it used to be a ball golf course, but it's becoming a go-to destination for frolf-ers. The grass is well kept and the water won't be much of a factor—no need to bring your waders. 1250 N. Redwood Road, Salt Lake City (See "Get Back to Your Roots," p. 62)

Creekside Park has been the core frolf course since Utah's scene came to existence. Scattered trees and moderate hills keep the scenic course interesting, though the unofficial Hole 21 offers a chance to practice under a pavilion before getting serious. It's still a local favorite, so watch out for a crowd. 1664 E. Murray-Holladay Road (4800 South), Holladay

University of Utah's frolf course is beginner-friendly with a green of only nine holes after being cut in half about a year ago. It comes with the usual pros and cons of a U of U facility: Lovely views of the city and mountains being the pros, but parking may be a problem. The Trax red line will take you right to it. Many note the course for its lack of foot traffic—in other words, fewer moving targets. 101 Wasatch Drive, Salt Lake City

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Valley Regional
This Taylorsville park will have plenty of patrons engaged in things other than frolfing, but the variety of shots and solid length of the course have many local enthusiasts singing its praises. It might be a quieter alternative to nearby Creekside. 5084 S. 2700 West, Salt Lake City

Solitude Mountain Resort
Aptly named Solitude offers dual enjoyment: Play the course, hike down the mountain. Frolfers rave about this course due to its mountainous setting. The course starts at 9,000 feet and winds along the mountainside for 18 holes. There's a lot of buzz in particular about the 1,200-foot Hole 18, which has a 400-foot vertical drop and takes quite the huck to conquer. Just keep a close eye on your disc so you don't lose it. Frolfers can pay $10 for the lift or hike half a mile to hole 1 for free. Solitude Ski Resort, 12000 Big Cottonwood Canyon, SkiSolitude.com

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Where to Putt Your Butt Off

Mulligans Golf & Games
Adjacent to a popular driving range, these courses are known for their lack of the usual wear-and-tear sported by other family courses. No themes, no neon lights—just simple, engaging mini-golf. Some holes are surprisingly challenging for real enthusiasts. 692 W. 10600 South, South Jordan, 801-254-3377, Mulligans-South.com, Cost: $5-$7, Open: April-October

Boondocks Fun Center—Draper & Kaysville
Think you have thick skin? See if you can handle the tiki head at the end of the course that heckles you for missing. A 30-foot volcano can also "erupt" at any time, so the atmosphere is pretty intense for mini golf. These sister facilities offers two courses apiece for your putt-putt pleasure. 75 East Southfork Drive, Draper, 801-838-9800; 525 S.Deseret Drive, Kaysville, 801-660-6800; Boondocks.com, Cost: $7, Open: May-August

Swan Lakes Golf Course
This outdoor course boasts fancier landscaping than most of its kind around the state, and the good lighting allows for games to be played well into the evening—the course closes at 10. 850 N. 2200 West, Layton, 801-546-1045, SwanLakesGolf.com, Cost: $4-$5, Open: March-November

Eagle Lake
The course carries a theme called The Mining Adventure, complete with waterfalls, streams and mountains—yes, mountains, the highest peak reaching 12 feet in altitude. It's designed to optimize family fun and improve the most serious golfer's short game. Eagle Lake Golf Courses, 756 West Old Mill Lane, Kaysville, 801-825-3467, EagleLake-Golf.com, Cost: $5-$6, Open: Year round, weather permitting

Cherry Hill
The website boasts that it's one of the most challenging courses in the state. True or not, it supplies all the kitsch-y wonders of the classic mini-golf experience: Windmills, castles, waterfalls and all. At summer's end, the course transforms to Scary Hill with all the spooky trimmings. 1325 S. Main, Kaysville, 801-451-5379, Cherry-Hill.com, Price: $6.50, Open: May-Sept. 12

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Get Back to Your Roots in Rose Park.
Rose Park is a nice, quiet neighborhood and the Roots Disc Golf Course (1200 N. Redwood Road) is a nice, quiet course that's great for families thanks to the hardcore disc golfers who endeavor to keep it that way. The golfers worked to get a grant from the city to restore the course—which was Utah's first, until it was converted to ball golf in 1986—to its past glory. Now the lush, green course is bustling on weekdays and weekends, a favorite of avid disc-ers and a popular draw for families keen to play this fun, free-to-play, fast-growing sport.
—Randy Harward

comments@cityweekly.net

 

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FUN & FESTIVE
The summer’s festivals and events are the perfect excuse to shimmy and shine

Compiled by Robby Poffenberger
comments@cityweekly.net

Few Utahns ever reached adulthood without having trounced around a fairground, munched on cotton candy and immersed themselves in local arts, music, ethnic traditions and agriculture. If it's been a while since you've "festivaled," this could be your summer to visit a new town and drink up the good times.

JUNE 4-7
Utah Pride Festival
Washington & Library squares
UtahPrideFestival.org

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JUNE 5-7
Days of Yore Festival
St. Thomas More Catholic Church
3015 E. Creek Road
STMUtah.org/doy

JUNE 6-13
Art City Days
Civic Center Park
50 S. Main, Springville
Springville.org/Art-City-Days

JUNE 6-OCT. 31
Provo Farmers Market
Saturdays 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Pioneer Park
500 W. Center St., Provo
ProvoFarmersMarket.org

JUNE 7-SEPT. 20
Park Silly Sunday Market
Sundays 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Historic Main Street, Park City
ParkSillySundayMarket.com

JUNE 8-13
Saratoga Splash Days
Neptune Park
452 W. 400 North,
Saratoga Springs
SaratogaSpringsCity.com/CivicEvents

JUNE 13- OCT. 31
Downtown Farmers Market
Saturdays 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Pioneer Park
300 South & 300 West
SLCFarmersMarket.org

JUNE 12-13
Ogden Arts Festival
Noon-8 p.m.
Ogden Municipal Gardens and Ampitheater
343 E. 25th St.
OgdenArtsFestival.com

Utah Scottish Festival & Highland Games
Thanksgiving Point
3033 N. Thanksgiving Way
Lehi
UtahScots.org

JUNE 13
Utah Asian Festival
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
South Town Expo Center
9575 S. State, Sandy
UtahAsianFestival.com

Heritage Arts Festival
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Bill of Rights Plaza
20 N. Main, Brigham City
BrighamCity.Utah.gov/Heritage-Arts-Festival.htm

Kaysville Arts & Music Festival
11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Heritage Park
250 N. Fairfield Road, Kaysville
KaysvilleCommunityEvents.com

JUNE 14-21
Pleasant Grove Strawberry Days
Various locations, Pleasant Grove
StrawberryDays.org

JUNE 14-SEPT. 20
Yoga Rocks the Park
Liberty Park
900 S. 700 East
YogaRocksThePark.com/salt-lake-city-utah.html

JUNE 14, JULY 12, AUG. 9, SEPT. 13, OCT. 11
Urban Flea Market
600 S. Main
9 a.m.-3 p.m.
FleaMarketSLC.com

JUNE 16-22
South Ogden Days
Various locations, South Ogden
SouthOgdenDays.com

JUNE 18-20
Summerfest Arts Faire
50 N. Main, Logan
LoganSummerfest.com

JUNE 18-21
WestFest
Centennial Park
5415 W. 3100 South, West Valley City
WestFest.org

JUNE 19-20
Chalk Art Festival
The Gateway
18 N. Rio Grande St.
ChalkArtFestival.org

JUNE 19-21
Tooele Arts Festival
Tooele City Park
200 W. Vine St., Tooele
TooeleArtsFestival.org

Salt Lake City Gem Faire
South Town Exposition Center
9575 S. State, Sandy
Eyes to the Sky Balloon Festival
Salina
EyesToTheSkyBalloon.com

JUNE 25-28
Utah Arts Festival
Library Square
210 E. 400 South
UAF.org

JUNE 26-28
Iceland Days
Spanish Fork City Park
49 S. Main, Spanish Fork
Facebook.com/IcelandicAssociationofUtah

JULY 1-5
North Ogden Cherry Days
North Ogden Park
2705 N. 550 East, Ogden
NorthOgdenCherryDays.com

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JULY 2-4
Provo Freedom Days
Various locations in Provo
FreedomFestival.org

4th of July Celebration
Fisher Park
920 S. 1000 East, Clearfield

JULY 2-5
Northern Ute 4th of July Celebration
Pow-Wow Grounds Fort Duschene
UteTribe.com

JULY 8-11
Utah Midsummer Renaissance Faire
Main Street Park
200 N. Main, Cedar City
UMRF.net

July 9
Eat Drink SLC
6-9 p.m.
Tracy Aviary
589 E. 1300 South
EatDrinkSLC.com

JULY 10-11
Payson Scottish Festival
Payson Memorial Park
250 S. Main, Payson

PaysonScottishFestival.org
July Jamboree Cruise-In
Historic Downtown Cedar City
JulyJamboree.com

JULY 18
Urban Arts Festival
11 a.m.-10 p.m.
The Gateway
18 N. Rio Grande St.
UrbanArtsFest.org

JULY 18-24
Days of '47 International Culture Fest
Various locations
Daysof47.com

JULY 23-24
Butlerville Days
Butler Park
2407 E. Bengal Blvd., Cottonwood Heights
CottonwoodHeights.Utah.gov/Home.ButlervilleDays

JULY 25-AUG. 1
Highland Fling Days
Highland
HighlandCity.org

JULY 28-AUG. 1
Springville World Folkfest
Spring Acres Park
700 S. 1300 East, Springville
WorldFolkFest.com

JULY 30-AUG 1
Tooele County Fair
Deseret Peak Complex
2930 W. Highway 112, Tooele
TooeleFair.com

JULY 31-AUG. 2
Kimball Arts Festival
Historic Main Street, Park City
ParkCityKimballArtsFestival.org

AUG. 1
Utah Ukulele Festival
10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Willow Park
419 W. 700 South, Logan
UtahUkeFest.com

AUG. 1-8
Summit County Fair
Fair Park
202 Park Road, Coalville
SummitCountyFair.org

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AUG. 5-8
Weber County Fair
Golden Spike Event Center
1000 N. 1200 West, Ogden
WeberCountyFair.org

AUG. 6-9
Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival
2100 South Highland Drive
GreatSaltLakeFringe.org

AUG. 7-8
Craft Lake City DIY Festival
Gallivan Center
239 S. Main
CraftLakeCity.com

AUG. 11-15
Bluffdale Old West Days
Various locations, Bluffdale
BluffdaleOldWestDays.com

AUG. 10-12
Utah County Fair
Spanish Fork Fairgrounds
475 S. Main, Spanish Fork
UtahCountyFair.org

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AUG. 14-15
Helper Arts & Musical Festival
Main Street, Helper
HelperArtsFest.com

AUG. 15
Utah Beer Festival
Library Square
CityWeekly.net

AUG. 15-OCT. 11
Snowbird Oktoberfest
Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort, Little Cottonwood Canyon
Saturdays
Snowbird.com/Events/Oktoberfest

AUG. 21-22
Great Basin Fiber Arts Fair
Salt Lake County Equestrian Park and Events Center
2100 W. 11400 South, South Jordan
GreatBasinFiberArtsFair.org

AUG. 27-29
Western Legends Roundup
Main Street, Kanab
WesternLegendsRoundup.com

SEPT. 4-5
Midway Swiss Days
Town Square, Midway
MidwaySwissDays.com

SEPT. 7
Wellsville Founders Day
9 a.m.-4 p.m.
100 E. 100 South, Wellsville
Facebook.com/WellsvilleFoundersDay

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SEPT. 9-12
Brigham City Peach Days
Various locations, Brigham City
BCAreaChamber.com/Pages/Peach-Days-Schedule

SEPT. 11-13
Salt Lake City Greek Festival
279 S. 300 West
SaltLakeGreekFestival.com

 

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BURN BABY BURN
Let your creative soul find expression at Element 11

By Jerre Wroble
jwroble@cityweekly.net
Photos by Rudy Van Bee

By day, Jeff Reese is lead systems developer for City Weekly's sister companies, Avenews Software and Kostizi. But outside of the office, he is Ranger Thermyte, chairman of the Element 11, Utah's regional Burning Man festival, scheduled this year July 9-12 at Stargazer Ranch in Box Elder County. The event attracts determined revelers of all stripes each year—but how can you tell if you belong there? Do you have to be an artistic exhibitionist? Reese says no, because, "everyone is a Burner! One of our most important principles is 'radical inclusion.' We are all about creative expression, having fun—and doing it responsibly. If you like learning new things and stretching your creative muscles, you will fit right in." To learn more about the festival, visit Element11.org, and check out what Reese had to say in the interview that follows:

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How did Element 11 come about?
The first Utah Regional Burn was in 1999 and was held at the Sun Tunnels. At first, it was run and coordinated by passionate community members who wanted to bring a piece of Burning Man home with them. Three years ago, we started a nonprofit 501(c)(3) and now have a working board of directors moving things forward.

Why is there a regional Burning Man when Utahns are so close to the real one in Nevada?
There are regional Burning Man events all over the country and world. Burning Man is much more than just a festival, it is a cultural movement. Part of the mission of Burning Man is to fund artists on new projects, and that's what we do locally, too.

How is Element 11 unique or different from Burning Man?
It is the brainchild of our local community. We have the same overall feel, it's just Utah flavored.

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Where is Element 11 held, and how many usually attend?
Since 2003, the festival was held at Bonneville Seabase. This year, in 2015, we're moving to a new venue called Stargazer Ranch in Box Elder County. We cap our attendance at 1,200 and have sold out the last few years.

What should newcomers expect to experience and/or be prepared for?
Expect to be blown away by the creativity of our participants. There are theme camps, art cars, performances, music, dancing, and we burn structures that our community builds for the festival. You will also see people wearing some of the craziest and amazing clothing you have ever seen. Radical Self Expression is one of our principles.

What is new this year?
There is always new art. Every year, Element 11 grants money to community artists so that they can create new and amazing things for the festival. You never know what people are going to come up with.

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In 2014, Element 11 experienced its first tragedy when a participant died at the festival. Have you changed the way you operate the festival?
With tragedy comes the opportunity for growth. We are closer than ever as a community, and we have learned a lot. We are committed to doing everything we can to make our festival as safe as possible. One thing we have done is start a monthly initiative called Food for Thought, a series of lectures about various issues, including our first one: "Dealing With Trauma." Preventing people from being in the state of mind to harm themselves is key to avoiding tragedy. We are also creating a new mental-health branch of volunteers for 2015's festival to help when people are having a hard time.

As an organizer, you have to be aware of everything going on, all the time. Is it hard to enjoy the festival?
I am an organizer because I love it. I don't experience the festival in the same way that I used to, but I see it as an evolution of my good time. I derive a great deal of pleasure from serving my community and a huge reward in seeing the amazing things they create. When you work closely with people on projects like Element 11, you get to know them better than you would in any other casual hang-out environment, and I value that greatly.

So why are you a Burner?
Because it is a culture of acceptance and creativity. We don't have fights at our events or gatherings. Burners clean up after themselves, and our events are always spotless afterward—even the big ones (seriously!). The growth and learning that comes from being a part of the community is amazing. We have a very large network of other regional events, and each year, Burning Man produces a Global Leadership Conference in San Francisco. Getting to know other leaders around the world and to experience their creativity is inspiring.

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How much does it cost to attend?
Tickets are $90 [Editor's note: As of press time, only about 175 tickets were available to purchase at Element11.org]. If you are interested in volunteering, you can talk to one of our volunteer coordinators, and they will fill you in.

 

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ON THE LOOSE
Curio shops, off-the-grid eateries and wayward haunts in which to while away a lazy summer day

By Randy Harward
comments@cityweekly.net

Remember summer vacations? Everyone signed your yearbook saying "stay cool" and "have a fun summer"—and that's exactly what you did. You attached Iron Maiden buttons to bottle rockets and sent them on a parabolic trajectory toward the neighbor's parched back lawn. You threw Chinese stars into the side of the landlord's shed. You slept outside in order to swathe That Girl's house in a two-ply expression of your love, signed, "Very truly yours, Prince Charmin'." Oh, and then there was the time you and your buddies made fake IDs out of baseball cards and told the Sugar House liquor-store security officer that, yes, you are frickin' Fernando Valenzuela, and kindly accept this jar of coins in exchange for that bottle of mezcal.
'Scuse me. I'm getting misty.

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Summer is such a magical time for a youngster, but who says the adventure has to end with graduation, or employment, marriage, parenthood and other such shackles? Even if you have to take it down a notch in order to demonstrate a modicum of personal growth, you can still have a good time. So reclaim your childhood this summer, starting with these suggestions, which are designed to get you out exploring new neighborhoods. (And maybe take the kids along—good parenting starts with being a good example.)

DOWNTOWN
Screw the ice-cream man—gimme a cookie!

Downtown Salt Lake City, being, you know, downtown doesn't seem like the kinda neighborhood that could benefit from press. But suppose you don't get down there very often? There are a few places you should know about. One of 'em is RubySnap (770 S. 300 West, 801-834-6111, RubySnap.com) a cute little bakery with riot-grrl spunk—so much so, that a portrait of Rosie the Riveter hangs behind the counter. What's more, each cookie is given a female name, and they work their way into your heart via your tummy. So here's your ostensibly counterintuitive summer tip: Thumb your nose at the ice-cream man this summer. Head into a tiny little building where the ovens are going all day long. Fork over 3 bucks for a cookie. Reflect briefly on how, to paraphrase Vincent Vega in Pulp Fiction, this better be one effin' good cookie. Then discover that, yes, yes, it is.

MAGNA
Monsters, tattoos, pizza, beer and sausage: Magna has it all.

What's to do in Magna? Well, until "Super" Dell Schanze ruined it for everybody, you used to could kick an owl while piloting yer paraglider. Verily, this sleepy little mining town at the foot of the Oquirrhs has occasionally been the butt of jokes about its lack of activity. Magna, however, is full of surprises. A big one is the combo tattoo studio/horror memorabilia shop, Art On You Studios (8971 W. 2700 South, 801-981-8180, ArtOnYou.com). Cool enough for downtown Salt Lake City or Sugar House, the combo vintage horror-movie theater/Old West tattoo shop overflows with small-town friendliness. Owner Storm loves to chat with fellow horror fans while pointing out such cinematic treasures as a film canister that once held a test reel for The Exorcist. There's also fresh, hot popcorn. His tattoo work, by the way, is top-notch and photo-realistic.

Next door, there's a decent pizza shop secreted inside The Filling Station (8987 W. 2700 South), a good-size bar with a similar aesthetic, a killer jukebox and Nonna's Pizzeria in back. Two blocks down the road, you can get your meat on at Colosimo's Standard Market (9009 W. 2700 South, 801-250-1088). You can either eat the soppressata and goat cheese on premises, or take it back up to Art on You, where you can pretend with Storm that they're your exposed innards. Afterward, head up into the Oquirrhs for a scenic hike. When you get to the top, peer down into the Kennecott copper-mine abyss, which looks suspiciously like the backyard of the Titty Twister in From Dusk Till Dawn.

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If you're free on July 18, Art on You Studios gets together with other Magna businesses and throws one hell of a block party: Halloween in July. For more information, visit HalloweenInSummerFestival.com.

WEST VALLEY CITY
Slashing prices at the swap meets.

Shopping, particularly sidewalk sales and swap meets, are big during summer months. The biggest swap meet in town is at the Redwood Drive-In (3688 S. Redwood Road, 801-973-7088, RedwoodDriveIn.com). On Saturdays and Sundays, 7 a.m.-4 p.m., the theater's parking spaces are packed with merchants offering great deals on new and used goods (cars start filing in for outdoor double features later in the evenings). So if you're lookin' for Mexican candy, furry seat covers, ladies' unmentionables, yard-sale/pawn-shop sundries, or a sweet butterfly knife, this is the place to go.

If you're in the mood for a little comparison shopping, head a few blocks north to Salt Lake's Indoor Swap Meet (3500 S. 1500 West, 801-887-7927, SaltLakesIndoorSwapMeet.com), which has all the same stuff—but, one reckons, an even wider selection of ridiculously ornate blades. Or go southwest to Randall's Market (3235 W. 4100 South, 801-966-7474) a converted 7-Eleven that's been selling tchotchkes and "close-coded" (read: expired but still safe) groceries since 2001. There, you can get three ice-cold cans of Coke for a dollar, or pop-culture treasures like Day of the Dead zombie costumes. They have some killer knives, too.

MILLCREEK/HOLLADAY
Get fragged in the shade at The Atomic Arcade

Vintage arcades, like movie theaters, make for a great escape from hot summer days. The Atomic Arcade (3939 S. Highland Drive, 801-634-1130) provides not only a place to cool off, but also a time-warp back to your childhood. Nice and dark, like an arcade should be, The Atomic Arcade offers vintage games at vintage prices. That means a pocketful of quarters gets you hours of fun on classic games like Galaga, Marble Madness, NBA Jam, Pengo, Tron, Off Road, Q*bert and various Pac-Mans. Once done, you can head across the street to A Bar Named Sue (3928 S. Highland Drive, 801-274-5578, ABarNamedSue.net) for some beer and grub, then carefully wobble back to the arcade, open from 3 p.m. until 1 a.m., for more gaming.

 

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SOUNDS OF SUMMER
From stadium concerts to intimate clubs, there’s a band showing up to rock your world

Compiled by Tiffany Frandsen
comments@cityweekly.net

Outdoor life is what Utah is all about, so it's only natural that we live for summer's outdoor music festivals and concert series. There are almost too many choices (not a bad problem to have), from downtown's Twilight Concert Series to Red Butte Garden's stellar lineup. Bands range from eclectic world music and blues to hard rock and indie—every Salt Laker will have something they can jam out to. And sure, the promise of air conditioning (and lack of mosquitoes) may lure you indoors to a club venue for a show. So get out there, get in there, and bust a move. (Note: Concert dates are subject to change. Check CityWeekly.net for updates)

June 4
Joe McQueen Quartet
The Garage on Beck

Dylan Roe
The Hog Wallow Pub

Holiday Mountain, Diatom
Kilby Court

Built to Spill, Lo-Fang, Sego
Ogden Twilight Series

Helio Sequence, Lost Lander
Urban Lounge

Whitey Morgan & the '78s
State Room

June 5
Bullets & Belles
The Garage on Beck

Bad Feather
The Hog Wallow Pub

Vagablonde, Barbaloot Suitz
The Royal

Joshua James, Sego, Quiet House
Provo Rooftop Concert Series

Ryan Shupe & the RubberBand
Sandy Amphitheater

Luciana
Sky

Dubwise, Von D, 2be, illoom
Urban Lounge

June 6
The Truman Brothers
Kenley Amphitheater

The Story So Far
The Complex

Dulce Sky
The Royal

Cirque, Life+, Panama
Sky

Mojave Nomads, The Raven & the Writing Desk, Lemon & Le Mule
Stereo Room

Plastic Plates, Devareaux, Typefunk
Urban Lounge

June 6
Gleewood
The Hog Wallow Pub

June 7
The Raven & the Writing Desk, Joel Pack & the Pops
Urban Lounge

June 8
Tori Kelly
The Depot

Emily Kinney
Kilby Court

Fighting the Phoenix, Alumni, Hollow I Am, Oculus
Loading Dock

World Party, Gabriel Kelly
Urban Lounge

June 9
JP Harris & Tough Choices
The Garage on Beck

The Doobie Brothers
Kenley Amphitheater

Dennis is Dead, Set Your Anchor
Loading Dock

Jared Ray Gilmore, Erasole James, Ske22um
Urban Lounge

Ufomammut, Usnea
Area 51

June 10
Blackberry Bushes
The Hog Wallow Pub

De Lux
Kilby Court

Shatterproof
Loading Dock

Celtic Woman
Maverik Center

The Doobie Brothers
Sandy Amphitheater

Preservation Hall Jazz Band
The State Room

The Life and Times, Mystic Braves, Magic Mint
Urban Lounge

June 11
Cosmic Gate
The Depot

Allen Michael Quartet
The Garage on Beck

Satisfi
The Hog Wallow Pub

Fetis, John de Alma, Ben Roa
Kilby Court

Blonde Redhead, Owen Pallett, The Raven & The Writing Desk
Ogden Twilight Series

Unwritten Law, Ten Foot Pole
Urban Lounge

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June 12
Tedeschi Trucks Band, Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings, Doyle Bramhall II
After putting her tour on hold for cancer treatments, Sharon Jones, from Brooklyn, is back on track with the Dap Kings and their most recent release, Give the People What They Want. The band's fifth studio record, the soul revivalist album is heavy with groovy funk and upbeat, dance-crazed beats. It's authentically short, clocking in at just over 30 minutes. Her dancing is as dexterous as her vocal performance; the diva can Twist, Jerk and Pony. They are performing in a lineup with Doyle Bramhall II opening and blues/rock group Tedeschi Trucks Band (from Florida) headlining. Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, June 12, 6 p.m., $55-$70, RedButteGarden.org

Calamity Cubes
The Garage on Beck

Stonefed
The Hog Wallow Pub

Broken Water, NSPS, days
Kilby Court

Brit Floyd
Maverik Center

Perish Lane, Never Before, Veio
The Royal

Dark Seas, Breakers, Albino Father
Urban Lounge

June 13
Kill Paris
The Depot

The Peculiar Patriots, Hectic Hobo
The Garage on Beck

The Steel Belts
The Hog Wallow Pub

CVPITVLS, Armpigs, Zombiecock
Kilby Court

Café R&B, The Lloyd Jones Struggle, The Soulistics
Utah Cultural Celebration Center

June 14
Morgan Snow
The Garage on Beck

Sage Francis, Wheelchair Sports Camp, Burnell Washburn
Urban Lounge

June 15
Agalloch, Helen Money
Urban Lounge

Surfer Blood, White Reaper
Bar Deluxe

June 16
Cooder-White-Skaggs, Robert Earl Keen
Red Butte Gardens

Coyote Vision Group
Urban Lounge

June 17
Stranger Band
Deer Valley

John Davis
The Hog Wallow Pub

American West Symphony
Sandy Amphitheater

Mewithoutyou, Foxing
Urban Lounge

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June 18
CrucialFest
Area 51, Urban Lounge

Sammy J
The Complex

Harry Lee & Back Alley Blues Band
Gallivan Plaza

Mark Chaney and the Garage All Stars
The Garage on Beck

Main Street Regulators
The Hog Wallow Pub

Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin
Kenley Amphitheater

Hollywood Ending
Kilby Court

Other Lives, Hamilton Leithauser, The Moth & The Flame
Ogden Twilight Series

Kottonmouth Kings
The Royal

Diamond Rio
Sandy Amphitheater

Delta Spirit
Urban Lounge

June 19
CrucialFest
Area 51, Urban Lounge

Ingrid Michaelson
The Complex

Shabazz Palaces, Better Taste Bureau
The Complex

Triggers & Slips
The Garage on Beck

Rage Against the Supremes
The Hog Wallow Pub

San Cisco, The Prettiots
Kilby Court

Sonic Prophecy, Shadowseer, Principium, Nopium
Loading Dock

June 20
CrucialFest
Area 51, Urban Lounge

Screen Door Porch, ThePatti Fiasco
The Garage on Beck

Bonanza Town
The Hog Wallow Pub

Nora Dates, Aspen Grove
Kilby Court

The Soulistics
O.P. Rockwell

Sinbad
Sandy Amphitheater

Cure for the Common
Snowbird

Willie Nelson, Alison Krauss
Usana Amphitheatre

June 21
CrucialFest
TBA

Jordan Young
The Garage on Beck

June 22
Pins, Secret Ablities
Kilby Court

Maudlin, Strangers, Lany, Oh, Be Clever
Loading Dock

June 23
Death Grips
The Complex

The Stone Foxes, Band on the Moon
Loading Dock

Lenka, Nick Howard
Urban Lounge

June 24
Theory of A
The Complex

Changing Lanes Experience
Deer Valley

Michelle Moonshine
The Hog Wallow Pub

The Mainstream, Mojave Nomads, Black Tie Event
Kilby Court

Gordon Lightfoot
Sandy Amphitheater

Grand Banks, Westward, Your Meteor, Electric Cathedral
Urban Lounge

June 25
Corey Christiansen Organ Trio
Gallivan Plaza

Morgan Snow
The Hog Wallow Pub

Claire Elise
Kilby Court

Purity Ring, Slow Magic, The Brocks
Ogden Twilight Series

Rob Thomas, Plain White Ts
Red Butte Gardens

Jack Beats
Sky

Tavaputs, Of Course Of Course, Stephen Lee Pratt
Urban Lounge

Karen Hakobyan, Micky & the Motorcars,
Utah Arts Festival

June 26
Granger Smith, Earl Dibbles Jr.
The Complex

The June Brothers, Michelle Moonshine
The Garage on Beck

Tony Holiday & The Velvetones
The Hog Wallow Pub

Low Roar
Kilby Court

I the Mighty, Hail the Sun, Too Close to Touch
Loading Dock

Sneaky Pete & The Secret Weapons
O.P. Rockwell

Orgone
The State Room

Radio Moscow, Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas
Urban Lounge

Erin Harpe & the Delta Swingers, Frank Vignola & Vinny Raniolo
Utah Arts Festival

June 27
Tyler, The Creator
The Complex

Taylor Caniff
The Complex

Phoenix Rising
The Hog Wallow Pub

Paul Revere's Raiders featuring Mitch Ryder
Kenley Amphitheater

Jelly Bread
Snowbird

Flash & Flare, Mr. Vandal, Gravy.Tron
Urban Lounge

Jon Morrow, The Wild Coyotes, John Gorka, Royal Southern Brotherhood
Utah Arts Festival

June 27
Trails and Ways, Waterstrider, RKDN
Kilby Court

June 28
Mark Farina
The Garage on Beck

Rachel Lee Priday, Vaudeville Etiquette, The Lloyd Jones Struggle
Utah Arts Festival

June 30
Toad the Wet Sprocket, Smash Mouth, Tonic
Deer Valley

Bobaflex, Penrose
The Royal

Scott H Biram
Urban Lounge

July 1
Robyn Cage
Deer Valley

Rose Pawn Shop
The Garage on Beck

Kayo Dot, Dust Moths
Kilby Court

Myriad Dance Company
The State Room

Breakers, Quiet Oaks, Strange Family
Urban Lounge

July 2
Joe McQueen
The Garage on Beck

The Family Crest
Kilby Court

Ancient River, Red Telephone, Lemon & Le Mule
Urban Lounge

Night Demon
Bar X

July 3
Funky Meters, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Lucia Micarelli
Deer Valley

Rosie & The Ramblers
The Garage on Beck

Arabrot
Kilby Court

July 4
Utah Symphony
Deer Valley

Blair Crimmins
Snowbird

July 5
Kristeen Young, FEA, Mermaid Baby
Kilby Court

Tanlines, Mas Ysa
Urban Lounge

Nickelback
Usana Amphitheatre

The Mother Hips, The Suffers, Johnny Utahs
Snowbasin

July 6
Widowspeak
Urban Lounge

July 7
Head North, Light Years, Casey Bolles
Loading Dock

July 8
The Chickens
Deer Valley

Kaz Mirblouk, Red Telephone
Kilby Court

International Folk Festival
Sandy Amphitheater

Electric Cathedral, Charles Ellsworth, Grand Banks
Urban Lounge

July 9
Brian Wilson, Rodriguez
Red Butte Gardens

Toe, StarRoe
Urban Lounge

Zac Brown Band
Usana Amphitheatre

July 10
Third Eye Blind, Dashboard Confessional
The Complex

Utah Symphony, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy
Deer Valley

Electric Cathedral, Charles Ellsworth
Kilby Court

Taylor Dayne
Sandy Amphitheater

L'Anarchiste, Haarlem, Big Wild Wings
Urban Lounge

July 11
Justin Martin
The Depot

Utah Symphony, Smokey Robinson
Deer Valley

Erica Hansen
Kenley Amphitheater

Arrival: The Music of ABBA
Sandy Amphitheater

Young Dubliners
Snowbird

Blitzen Trapper
The State Room

Rocky Votolato & Dave Hause, Chris Farren
Urban Lounge

July 13
Ceremony, Tony Molina, Creative Adult
Kilby Court

Rush
Maverik Center

July 14
Indigo Girls
Kenley Amphitheater

Letlive., Charlatan, Visitors
Loading Dock

Hank Williams, Jr., Luke Bell
Red Butte Gardens

Lissie, Tyler Lyle
Urban Lounge

July 15
Slickrock Gypsies
Deer Valley

Sonreal
Kilby Court

July 16
Warren Haynes, Gov't Mule
Deer Valley

Pacific Groove
Gallivan Plaza

Mark Robinette's Amp'd Up Band featuring Collin Raye
Kenley Amphitheater

Death Cab for Cutie, Tune-yards
Twilight Concert Series

The Appleseed Cast, Dads, The Coaster
Urban Lounge

Darius Rucker
Usana Amphitheatre

July 16
Heartless Breakers, Larusso, Sights
Urban Lounge

July 17
Utah Symphony
Deer Valley

Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers
Kenley Amphitheater

Through the Gates, Aether, The Anchor, Like Wildfire
Loading Dock

The Adarna, Never Before, Moneypenny
Kilby Court

Salt Lake City Jazz Orchestra
Sandy Amphitheater

The Adolescents & the Weirdos
Urban Lounge

July 18
Morrissey, Amanda Palmer
The Depot

Utah Symphony
Deer Valley

Cayucas
Kilby Court

Alive Like Me, Hour 24, Racing On the Sun
Loading Dock

One Voice Children's Choir
Sandy Amphitheater

Earphunk
Snowbird

Van Halen
Usana Amphitheatre

July 19
Mavis Staples, Patty Griffin, Amy Helm & the Handsome Strangers
Red Butte Gardens

Train
Usana Amphitheatre

July 20
Alice In Chains
The Depot

Kip Moore
EnergySolutions Arena

Good Old War
Kilby Court

Ces Cru, Joey Cool, Self Expression Music
Loading Dock

Eleni Mandell
Kilby Court

July 21
Say Anything, Modern Baseball, Cymbals Eat Guitars, Hard Girls
The Complex

The Hunts
Kilby Court

Steve Miller Band
Red Butte Gardens

July 22
Tracorum
Deer Valley

Jonny Slaughter, The Bipolar Express, Homo Leviticus\
Urban Lounge

July 23
Easton Corbin, Parmalee
Deer Valley

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Father John Misty
Twilight Concert Series

Slim Cessna's Auto Club
Urban Lounge

July 24
Turnpike
The Complex

Utah Symphony
Deer Valley

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July 25
Toby Keith
Recording and touring relentlessly since the '90s, country singer Toby Keith (originally from Oklahoma, but now living in Nashville) is presenting his 18th studio album, 35 MPH Town at the Usana Amphitheatre. The singer's foundation, the Toby Keith Foundation, is also using the tour, called Good Times & Pick Up Lines, to raise money for cancer patients. The show kicks off with Chris Janson and Ned Ledoux. Usana Amphitheatre, 5125 S. 6400 West, July 25, 7 p.m., $20-$59.75, Usana-Amp.com

Utah Symphony, Frank Sinatra, Jr.
Deer Valley

Whiskey Gentry
Snowbird

Timpanogos Music Festival
Mt. Timpanogos Park

Toby Beard
The State Room

Torche, Melt Banana, Hot Nerds
Urban Lounge

July 26
Lyle Lovett & his Large Band
Red Butte Gardens

Coliseum
Urban Lounge

July 27
Between the Buried, Animals As Leaders, The Contortionist\
The Complex

Sugar Ray, Better Than Ezra, Uncle Kracker, Eve 6
Red Butte Gardens

Andrea Gibson, Chris Pureka
Urban Lounge

July 28
Charli XCX, Bleachers, Borns
The Complex

Imagine Dragons
EnergySolutions Arena

Chappo, Yukon Blond
Kilby Court

Lower Dens, Young Ejecta
Urban Lounge

July 29
Motherlode Canyon Band
Deer Valley

Mötley Crüe, Alice Cooper
EnergySolutions Arena

Anthony Raneri, Laura Stevenson, Allison Weiss
Kilby Court

Lady Antebellum
Usana Amphitheatre

Unknown Mortal Orchestra
Urban Lounge

July 30
Esperanza Spalding, Perla Batalla, Anna Wilson
Deer Valley

Evenings in Brazil
Gallivan Plaza

Prhyme, Adrian Young, Bishop Nehru, J Godina
Twilight Concert Series

Fall Out Boy, Wiz Khalifa
Usana Amphitheatre

July 31
Utah Symphony
Deer Valley

Max Pain & the Groovies, Breakers, Heavy Does
Urban Lounge

August 1
Utah Symphony, Ozomatli
Deer Valley

Imagine
Kenley Amphitheater

Vans Warped Tour
Utah State Fairpark

Todo Mundo
Snowbird

A.A Bondy, Will Sartain
Urban Lounge

10,000 Maniacs
Canyons Resort

August 4
Grace Potter & the Nocturnals
Deer Valley

Alabama Shakes, Chicano Batman
Red Butte Gardens

August 5
Rob Bell
The Complex

Chet Faker
The Depot

The Kings of 88
Deer Valley

Sam Smith
Maverik Center

August 6
Kenny Chesney
EnergySolutions Arena

Kansas
Kenley Amphitheater

Michael Franti & Spearhead
Red Butte Gardens

The Kills, Metz, Fictionist
Twilight Concert Series

Lee Gallagher, Season of the Witch, Dark Seas, Wyatt Trash
Urban Lounge

August 7
High on Fire
The Complex

Utah Symphony
Deer Valley

X Ambassadors, LANY
Kilby Court

John Fogerty
Red Butte Gardens

August 8
Walk the Moon
The Complex

Utah Symphony, Kristin Chenoweth
Deer Valley

The Suffers
Snowbird

Jackie Greene Band
The State Room

Dusky, TypeFunk, Blessed 1
Urban Lounge

Kelly Clarkson
Usana Amphitheatre

August 9
Jackie Greene Band
The State Room

August 10
Lake Street Dive
The State Room

August 11
R5
Maverik Center

Lake Street Dive
The State Room

August 12
Son of Ian
Deer Valley

Trampled By Turtles, The Devil Makes Three
Red Butte Gardens

August 13
Michael McDonald
The Depot

Changing Lanes Experience
Gallivan Plaza

The Word, Lee Field & The Expressions
Twilight Concert Series

Tinariwen
Urban Lounge

August 14
Jason Isbell, Damien Jurado
The Depot

Utah Symphony, Diana Krall
Deer Valley

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August 15
Kaskade, Flux Pavilion
Kaskade, the stage name of Chicago DJ Ryan Raddon, once played an epic—a 12-hour set of electronic dance music at the Marquee nightclub in Las Vegas. That was three years ago. Since then, Kaskade has churned out more material, including a recent single, "Never Sleep Alone," and although the entire EDM festival (entitled Das Energi 2015) is slated to last more than ten hours, expect a set not much longer than two hours (which is still lengthy). In addition to the musical trance induced by Kaskade, the visuals he brings along are mesmerizing and often more involved than a general lightshow (he has used animated pilots and giant robots, cityscapes, animals and trees). Flux Pavilion is also on the bill, with the rest of the lineup to be announced shortly. The Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Dr., Aug. 15, 4 p.m., $40-$100

Chris Botti, Joshua Bell
Deer Valley

Shania Twain
EnergySolutions Arena

August 16
Brandi Carlile, Anderson East
Red Butte Gardens

Shane Koyczan & the Short Story Long
The State Room

August 17
Rodrigo y Gabriela
Red Butte Gardens

August 18
Dawes, James Vincent McMorrow
The Depot

Wilco, Vetiver
Red Butte Gardens

KMFDM, Chant, Inertia
Urban Lounge

August 19
Crescent Super Band
Deer Valley

August 20
Run the Jewels, House of Lewis
Twilight Concert Series

Mimi Knowles, Static Waves, VanLadyLove
Urban Lounge

Joe Bonamassa
Usana Amphitheatre

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August 21
Slipknot, Lamb of God
Usana Amphitheatre

August 22
The Gipsy Kings, Nicolas Reyes, Tonino Baliard
Deer Valley

August 23
Sublime, Rome
Usana Amphitheatre

August 24
Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club
Red Butte Gardens

"Weird Al" Yankovic
Sandy Amphitheater

August 25
Garrison Keillor's A Prairie Home Companion
Red Butte Gardens

August 26
Park City All Star Jam Session
Deer Valley

Chris Isaak
Sandy Amphitheater

Luke Bryan
Usana Amphitheatre

August 27
Three Days Grace, Like A Storm, Otherwise
The Depot

Juana Ghani
Gallivan Plaza

Suzy Bogguss
Kenley Amphitheater

Luke Bryan
Usana Amphitheatre

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August 28
Colbie Caillat, Christina Perri
Sandy Amphitheater

August 29
Lee Brice
Deer Valley

August 31
Yes, Toto
Red Butte Gardens

September 1
Salt Lake City Jazz Festival
Gallivan Plaza

Los Lonely Boys
Kenley Amphitheater

September 2
Donny Osmond
Sandy Amphitheater

September 3
Social Distortion, Nikki Lane, Drag the Rier
The Depot

Donny Osmond
Kenley Amphitheater

September 4
Taylor Swift
EnergySolutions Arena

Howard Jones
The Egyptian

September 6
Aloe Blacc
Deer Valley

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Cake
Red Butte Gardens

September 8
ZEDD
The Great Saltair

September 9
Australian Pink Floyd Show
Usana Amphitheatre

September 10
Josh Wright
Gallivan Plaza

September 11
LeAnn Rimes
Sandy Amphitheater

September 12
A.J. Croce
Kenley Amphitheater

The Guess Who, Firefall, Orleans, Al Stewart
Sandy Amphitheater

Tim McGraw
Usana Amphitheatre

September 15
Mark Knopfler
Red Butte Gardens

ZZ Top
Canyons

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September 16
Damian Marley, Stephen Marley, Morgan Heritage, Tarrus Riley
Two of Bob Marley's sons, Damian ("Junior Gong") and Stephen ("Ragga") sound like their pop, but clearly aren't impersonators; in addition to the mellow music, the brothers bump some heavier beats, and work more hip hop and dubstep into albums. Expect a couple covers from the reggae legend's discography, but may have new material to perform (fingers crossed, as Damian has been promising the new solo album for a year), including Stephen's new rap/dancehall track, "Ghetto Boy." The brothers are on tour (named after Bob Marley & the Wailer's 1973 release, Catch a Fire) with Morgan Heritage, Tarrus Riley, Jo Mersa and Black Am I. The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m., $38, TheComplexSLC.com

Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals
Red Butte Gardens

September 19
David Archuleta
Kenley Amphitheater

Brad Paisley
Usana Amphitheatre

September 21
David Archuleta
Kenley Amphitheater

September 26
Twenty One Pilots
The Great Saltair

September 28
Def Leppard
Usana Amphitheatre

 

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HOMAGE TO THE SUN
How doing nothing on the Fourth of July is plenty

By Colby Frazier
cfrazier@cityweekly.net

Even though I'm old now, the word "summer" still holds some magic. It's a time of possibility and freedom, when being outside is comfortable—and by "being," I mean doing anything and everything outside.

But summer has one huge problem—it tends to fill up with too much fun stuff. And when that occurs, it can breed a secondary problem: doing too much fun stuff. A glut of fun can be just as terrible as doing no fun stuff. Everyone knows what it feels like to teeter on the brink of fun overload. It is seen on the faces of mothers and fathers who drag their children to swimming lessons, baseball games, birthday parties and fireworks displays—all in the same day. It is an ailment that young adults encounter when torn between going to this party or that party and then to a bar or a concert and then to yet another party. And for the child wailing in the backseat of a searing hot car on the way home from the carnival, too much fun can be identified by the number and color of ice-cream stains on a face.

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After too many summers of doing too much fun stuff, I decided two years ago that I would take one day of summer—the Fourth of July—and do nothing.

The first year went really well. My wife and daughter were out of town, so I didn't have to worry myself with other people's fun stuff. I contacted a friend, and we planned a small barbecue, during which we would do nothing more than cook meat, drink beer and watch the sun travel across the weary blue sky.

In order to honor the day of nothingness, we each did our shopping a day early. My pal bought a tri-tip—my favorite style of cow to heat up and eat—and I brought 5 gallons of beer. The usual side dishes, like chips and salsa, were consumed.

The sun marched across the sky and beat down on my reddening arms. I stared it down, sure of myself, cocky in my approach to living this day. I watched my pal's dog, Banjo, bark and jump at birds. I marveled at my friend's mighty garden with its shining bright-green leaves, the vines already heavy with the year's crops.

As we drank our beers and ate our food, we laughed about our wisdom in choosing to do nothing. I knew that beyond this fenced-in patch of yard I sat in, hordes of people in Salt Lake City were running in road races, standing in food lines, sitting in traffic and watching parades. "Not me—never again," I thought, as I watched the sun dip westward.

As the evening cooled, the boom of fireworks filled the air. From my perch in the back yard, I could not see the spectacle, but the sounds were vivid and jarring. For several more hours, we sat. Friends, thwarted in their attempts to convince us to visit them, visited us. There was talk of patronizing a bar, but we stayed true to our day and remained stuck in our seats.

Though my skin was substantially sunburned, I resolved to repeat this tradition the following year. My wife and daughter were on board. As if preparing to observe the Sabbath, we made our preparations and fortifications the day before. I invited all of my co-workers and friends over to experience this event, urging them to remain in their seats, or very near their seats, until the day expired. Many people came, and without taking a poll, many seemed to enjoy the lazy ambiance of sitting quite still in one place for several hours.

As this summer approaches, the usual long list of fun stuff is once again piling high. It will take a surprising amount of effort each day to shield myself from taking on too much fun. On the Fourth of July, though, when everyone else is red-lining, I'll be stuck in some chair with a beverage, paying homage to simplicity.