The Way It Is | Tracy Johnson | News | Salt Lake City | Salt Lake City Weekly
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The Way It Is | Tracy Johnson

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We asked equipment technician Tracy Johnson: Why is Halloween is still so popular despite efforts to stamp it out?

I remember the Halloween parades where schoolchildren would go from classroom to classroom to see all of the scary and fun costumes. My daughter-in-law in Kaysville has told me that children aren’t allowed to wear costumes to her son’s school on Halloween. It’s sad, really. These little chaps don’t get to make the same memories we did. After 9/11, my workplace put out a memo saying that costumes could not resemble death or contain gore. It’s ironic, actually, that a holiday meant to be scary and ugly has been affected by the inflated economy, school violence and terrorism—some of the ugliest and scariest things we Americans have known.

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