What the Cluck? | Buzz Blog
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What the Cluck?

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City Weekly did not get the memo that covers of alternative news publications in the first week of June needed to be farmer-themed. --- It would seem the Catalyst, In Utah This Week and Utah Stories did heed the agrarian muse, with each designing variations on Grant Wood's iconic "American Gothic" painting (here).

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Catalyst and In Utah This Week uncannily featured bare-chested, grim-faced men with fowl clutched under their right arms. Utah Stories settled on a stylized depiction of the farmer and his sister in the original painting.

And then there's SLUG, whose grim-faced Viking, depicted in a block print style, promotes SLUG's annual beer issue. But, give him a shave, take off his horned helmet, replace his sword tip with a pitchfork, and his stony face would be a dead ringer for American Gothic's farmer. Minus his sister.

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For the record, CW's June 2 cover featured a smiling woman in a three-way embrace with two fedora-hatted hipsters. No fowl, no pitchforks, no swords, no steins. She is, as you properly guessed, the farmer's daughter.

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