Movie Reviews: Blackhat, The Wedding Ringer, Paddington | Buzz Blog
We need your help.

Newspapers and media companies nationwide are closing or suffering mass layoffs since the coronavirus impacted all of us starting in March. City Weekly's entire existence is directly tied to people getting together in groups--in clubs, restaurants, and at concerts and events--which are the industries most affected by new coronavirus regulations.

Our industry is not healthy. Yet, City Weekly has continued publishing thanks to the generosity of readers like you. Utah needs independent journalism more than ever, and we're asking for your continued support of our editorial voice. We are fighting for you and all the people and businesses hardest hit by this pandemic.

You can help by making a one-time or recurring donation on PressBackers.com, which directs you to our Galena Fund 501(c)(3) non-profit, a resource dedicated to help fund local journalism. It is never too late. It is never too little. Thank you. DONATE

Movie Reviews: Blackhat, The Wedding Ringer, Paddington

by

comment
blackhat.jpg
Studly computer hackers and a cuddly bear are among the new heroes in Utah theaters this weekend.

Scott Renshaw appreciated some of the gritty style in Michael Mann's cyber-thriller Blackhat (pictured), but couldn't quite get past the joylessness and lack of interest in the human characters. And he appreciated some of the back-story in the fact-based underdogs-make-good tale Spare Parts, but not the choices made on which characters deserved the most attention.

Eric D. Snider lamented the easy jokes and lack of effort in the Kevin Hart/Josh Gad best-man-for-hire comedy The Wedding Ringer.

Danny Bowes was delighted by the easy-going charm of Paddington, featuring the big screen adventures of Michael Bond's beloved bear.

In this week's feature reviews, Scott Renshaw focused on the power of Bradley Cooper's performance as a troubled soldier in American Sniper rather than the possible historical inaccuracies, while Eric D. Snider was wowed by the riveting, unsettling character study of Foxcatcher.