Movie Reviews: Doctor Strange, Trolls, Hacksaw Ridge | Buzz Blog
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Movie Reviews: Doctor Strange, Trolls, Hacksaw Ridge

Christine, Aquarius

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Marvel's Sorcerer Supreme hits theaters, along with animated toys, a real-life war story and two indie dramas about fascinating women.

The animated jukebox-musical Trolls  doesn't offer much story creativity, but at least brings some energy and distinctive visual texture to its universe. Christine tells the fact-based, potentially exploitative story of troubled journalist Christine Chubbuck with intriguing social commentary and a terrific central performance by Rebecca Hall.

MaryAnn Johanson finds the distinctive visuals of Doctor Strange  (pictured) can't hide a yawning hole where the story should be. The epic Brazilian drama Aquarius used a wonderful Sonia Braga performance to serve a lovely meditation on aging, home, memory and family.

In this week's feature review, the fascinating true story behind Hacksaw Ridge gets lost in a war movie that evokes other, better war movies.

Also opening this week, but not available for review: director Jim Jarmusch's documentary study of Iggy Pop and The Stooges in Gimme Danger.