Movie Review Roundup: Wonder Woman, Captain Underpants, Wakefield | Buzz Blog
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Movie Review Roundup: Wonder Woman, Captain Underpants, Wakefield

Love, Kennedy; Chasing Trane; Churchill

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Not one but two beloved super-heroes hit multiplexes this weekend, while a local true story, the story of Winston Churchill and a documentary about a jazz legend are among the counter-programming options.

Wonder Woman finds a successful formula for the DC Movie Universe by taking a page from the DC TV Universe. Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie (pictured) matches the silly potty-humor vibe of the source books, while also providing a spirited defense of silly potty humor. Chasing Trane provides an effective approach to the genius of John Coltrane by mostly letting the music do the talking. The inspirational Utah true story of Love, Kennedy jerks some tears, but is mostly an earnest one-note hymn for the believers.

MaryAnn Johanson finds the biopic Churchill never picks up enough steam to carry its thin story.

In this week's feature review, a big performance by Bryan Cranston might be just the right kind of performance for the psychological drama of Wakefield.